Recent Publications by IRSCL Members

The following books by IRSCL members have been recently published or are forthcoming:

The Routledge Companion to International Children’s Literature edited by John Stephens (Routledge, September 2017)

Demonstrating the aesthetic, cultural, political, and intellectual diversity of children’s literature across the globe, The Routledge Companion to International Children’s Literature is the first volume of its kind to focus on the undervisited regions of the world. With particular focus on Asia, Africa, and Latin America, the collection raises awareness of children’s literature and related media as they exist in large regions of the world to which ‘mainstream’ European and North American scholarship pays very little attention.

The Routledge Companion to Picturebooks edited by Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer (Routledge, November 2017)

Containing 48 essays by leading and new scholars, this Companion is the ultimate guide to picturebooks. It contains a detailed introduction by the editor, surveying the history and development of the field and emphasising the international and cultural diversity of picturebooks. Divided into 5 key parts the book covers: concepts – from within picturebooks, but also applied from literary theory; genres – from baby books to picturebooks for adults – their relations to other forms such as comics and visual media; domains and theoretical approaches; and adaptations and media.

More Words about Pictures: Current Research on Picture Books and Visual/Verbal Texts for Young People edited by Naomi Hamer, Perry Nodelman, and Mavis Reimer (Routledge)

This volume represents the current state of research on picture books and other adjacent hybrid forms of visual/verbal texts such as comics, graphic novels, and book apps, with a particular focus on texts produced for and about young people. When Perry Nodelman’s Words about Pictures: the Narrative Art of Children’s Picture Books was published almost three decades ago, it was greeted as an important contribution to studies in children’s picture books and illustration internationally; and based substantially on it, Nodelman has recently been named the 2015 recipient of the International Grimm Award for children’s literature criticism. In the years since Words About Pictures appeared, scholars have built on Nodelman’s groundbreaking text and have developed a range of other approaches, both to picture books and to newer forms of visual/verbal texts that have entered the marketplace and become popular with young people. The essays in this book offer ‘more words’ about established and emerging forms of picture books, providing an overview of the current state of studies in visual/verbal texts and gathering in one place the work being produced at various locations and across disciplines. Essays exploring areas such as semiological and structural aspects of conventional picture books, graphic narratives and new media forms, and the material and performative cultures of picture books represent current work not only from literary studies but also media studies, art history, ecology, Middle Eastern Studies, library and information studies, and educational research. In addition to work by international scholars including William Moebius, Erica Hateley, Nathalie op de Beeck, and Nina Christensen that carries on and challenges the conclusions of Words about Pictures, the collection also includes a wide-ranging reflection by Perry Nodelman on continuities and changes in the current interdisciplinary field of study of visual/verbal texts for young readers. Providing a look back over the history of picture books and the development of picture book scholarship, More Words About Pictures also offers an overview of our current understanding of these intriguing texts.

Canon Constitution and Canon Change in Children’s Literature edited by Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer and Anja Müller (Routledge)

This volume focuses on the (de)canonization processes in children’s literature, considering the construction and cultural-historical changes of canons in different children’s literatures. Chapters by international experts in the field explore a wide range of different children’s literatures from Great Britain, Germany, Scandinavia, the Low Countries, Eastern and Central Europe, as well as from Non-European countries such as Australia, Israel, and the United States. Situating the inquiry within larger literary and cultural studies conversations about canonicity, the contributors assess representative authors and works that have encountered changing fates in the course of canon history. Particular emphasis is given to sociological canon theories, which have so far been under-represented in canon research in children’s literature. The volume therefore relates historical changes in the canon of children’s literature not only to historical changes in concepts of childhood but to more encompassing political, social, economic, cultural, and ideological shifts. This volume’s comparative approach takes cognizance of the fact that, if canon formation is an important cultural factor in nation-building processes, a comparative study is essential to assessing transnational processes in canon formation. This book thus renders evident the structural similarities between patterns and strategies of canon formation emerging in different children’s literatures.

Dans les rêves de grand-père by Jean Perrot (Albin Michel)

Jean Perrot quitte sa stature de spécialiste de littérature enfantine et dévoile ici son rôle de grand-père. Avec cet album, il livre à son petit-fils quelques poèmes, jalonnant les étapes de la naissance à l’envol de l’enfant devenu adulte. Attention, étonnement, goût du jeu, inquiétude, admiration… le grand-père dit, en quelques mots, les émotions et les sentiments ressentis sur ce chemin partagé. Des mots pétris d’écoute et de délicatesse, qui se chargent, au fil du temps qui passe, du sens de la vie et qui expriment cet art merveilleux d’être grand-père.

CFP – Special Issue of TEXTURA: Children’s and Young Adult Digital Literature: Apps, Readers and Literary Education

Call for Papers for Special Issue of TEXTURA
Children’s and Young Adult Digital Literature: Apps, Readers and Literary Education
Editors: Edgar Roberto Kirchof, Neus Real, and Cristina Correro

Major changes which digital literature has been generating, as much in the production for children and young adults as in their experiences as readers, place new challenges for literary education. Educators need to know this reality deeply in order to be able to integrate it into the classroom and respond to the social and cultural changes which follow it. The academic journal TEXTURA proposes the publication of a special issue on the theme to contribute to this field, bringing forth reflection and debate. Thus, researchers from international institutions are invited to submit articles which address the following issues:

1) Digital children’s and young adult literature: theory and practice.
2) Literary apps for children and young adults: distinctive features, novelties proposed and potential for literary education (with the possibility of studying specific cultural traditions, i.e., literary apps in a specific language or produced in a specific country).
3) Children’s and young adult digital reading: changes, challenges and continuity.
4) Children and young adult digital literature at school: experiences with children and young adults.

The articles should contain between 30,000 and 50,000 characters in total, including spaces and compulsory elements (title, author, abstract, keywords, full text and references). Articles in Portuguese, Spanish, English, French, and German are accepted. Foreign language articles should contain the English translation of the title, abstract and key words. Articles should be sent to the website of the academic journal TEXTURA: http://www.periodicos.ulbra.br/index.php/txra for external evaluation. Deadline: 31 October 2017. The result of external evaluation will be notified in the following two months.

CFP – Girls’ Studies/Girls’ Culture

CFP: Girls’ Studies/Girls’ Culture
Deadline: April 30, 2017

The Girls’ Studies/Girls’ Cultures Area of the Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association invites proposals for the 2017 MPCA/ACA conference to be held at the Hyatt Regency in St. Louis, MO, October 18-22.

We seek proposals for papers and presentations from graduate students, academics, educators, and activists on girls, girlhoods, girls’ cultures, and the media.

Suggested topics include:

  • media representations of girls, girlhood, girls’ cultures
  • girls as media producers, consumers, and critics
  • girls, politics and activism
  • girls’ organizations
  • girls and work
  • girls, play, and princess cultures
  • transgender girlhood
  • dolls, toys, games
  • fashion and cosmetics
  • girls, friends, and bullies
  • girls, feelings and fantasies
  • girlhood, mental illness, and the media
  • girlhood, education, and vocational training
  • policing girls and girlhood
  • girls, music, dance, and the arts
  • girls, disabilities, and the body
  • shifting definitions of girlhood
  • girls, social media, and digital practices
  • girls, traditional, digital, and media literacy
  • girls, media, and cultural work
  • girls, moral panics, and the media
  • girls and STEM
  • girls and discourses
  • rural girls and media
  • girls, religion, and popular culture
  • girls, intersectionality, and media
  • girls and popular culture methodologies
  • girls, popular culture, and pedagogy
  • girls’ identities and popular culture

Please submit (300-word) abstracts for single papers or full panels (3 to 4 papers max) here: http://submissions.mpcaaca.org by April 30, 2017.

More info about the conference is available here: http://mpcaaca.org/

For questions and queries about the Girls’ Studies/Girls’ Culture Area, please contact Miriam Forman-Brunell: Forman-BrunellM@umkc.edu

CFP – Youth Literature and Media Area of the Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association

The Youth Literature and Media Area of the Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association invites papers for the 2017 MPCA/ACA conference in St. Louis, MO, October 18-22.

There is much to query about the kids these days. This past year we saw the rise of Teen Vogue as a political voice, but a simultaneous decline in the percentage of youth who voted. Millennials now outnumber baby boomers, but are perhaps becoming old news themselves as Forbes Millennials are now outnumbered by Generation Z. Transgender youth have been at the center of debates over school bathroom policies, civil rights, privacy, safety, and identity. Meanwhile, Dorothy Wang became “funemployed” once again.

We are looking for proposals for papers on any aspect of Youth Literature and Media, from the latest YA best seller to my nine-year-old son’s YouTube channel. This area takes an expansive approach to youth, literature, and media. We are interested in youth as both producers and consumers of literature and media, representations of children and youth in literature and media, and the study of lit and media aimed at children and youth.

What more to chew on? How about:

  • Shifting definitions of youth
  • Revisiting youth through nostalgia, revivals, and reboots of old TV shows
  • Youth culture becoming adult culture
  • Millennials, elections, politics, and policies
  • Adult audiences of YA Lit and other youth culture
  • Images and discussion of youth in the news
  • Youth and Social Media: where the kids go when their parents join Facebook
  • Youth access to mediav
  • Youth and traditional, digital, and media literacy…and illiteracy
  • Moral panics around youth
  • Youth and technology
  • Youth subversion of mainstream discourses
  • “Youth” and intersectionality
  • Rural youth
  • Youth in the Trump Era
  • What’s absent from representations of youth in media?

Please submit proposals of single papers or full panels at http://submissions.mpcaaca.org by April 30, 2017.

More info about the conference is available here: http://mpcaaca.org/

For questions and queries about the Youth Literature and Media Area, please contact Patrick Cox, patrick.cox@rutgers.edu.

CFP – Inside the World of Harry Potter

Inside the World of Harry Potter is a proposed interdisciplinary, multi-contributor volume born of the robust field of Harry Potter Studies and the community of collaborators that exists within the Southwest Popular/American Culture Association.

This proposed volume will cover a range of topics within the works of J.K. Rowling. The Harry Potter series is such a rich text for analysis, particularly of social issues that can be extrapolated to real-world, non-fictional settings. The scholarship being produced surrounding the Harry Potter series is phenomenal.

As such, this call for chapters invites interested scholars to submit papers and/or proposals for publication consideration in this edited volume.

Contributions should use the works of J.K. Rowling (the Harry Potter series, or companion works such as The Tales of Beedle the Bard, Fantastic Creatures and Where to Find Them, or Quidditch Through the Ages) to address a social or political issue, such as race, class, gender, sexual orientation, societal structure, age, muggle vs. wizard relations, technology, religion, and so forth. Work using paratexts, such as Pottermore, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Potter Puppet Pals, and the like will be accepted as well. All themes will be considered as related to the overall direction of the volume. In addition, work related to fan practices, or application to real-world issues are always welcome.

Proposals from any academic discipline will be considered. Emerging and early career scholars are especially encouraged to submit. Final papers should be no longer than 30 pages, including references, and should be scholarly in nature yet accessible in language and tone.

For consideration, please submit an abstract/proposal of no more than 500 words to Dr. Christopher Bell, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, at cbell3@uccs.edu. Abstracts/proposals should be sent as Word Document attachments, and should include the author(s)’s name, affiliation, title and email contact information. Abstracts/proposals should be submitted no later than May 1, 2017. Final papers will be due September 1, 2017.

University Lecturer in English and Children’s Literature at University of Cambridge

The Faculty of Education in central Cambridge seeks to appoint a University Lecturer in English and Children’s Literature from 1 October 2017. The successful candidate will engage fully in research and teaching activities in this field and is expected to make an immediate contribution. He/she will be expected to contribute to strengthening the international profile of research within the Faculty. Teaching duties will include teaching and supervision of undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral students. This post offers an opportunity for a research-active educator to join a leading national and international centre for educational research, teacher development, and the study of education.

Candidates will hold a doctorate in a relevant field. They will have a record of internationally excellent research in their field. Contributions to excellence in research will be through peer-reviewed publications and other activities of a kind and quality that meet international standards as assessed in national research assessment exercises.

Candidates will normally have relevant experience of working with postgraduate students, including contributing to Masters programmes and supervising PhD students.

Please also see the further particulars for this post.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the Apply. This will route you to the University’s Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Informal enquiries may be addressed to Professor Geoff Hayward (gfh22@cam.ac.uk).

We hope to hold interviews on 8 and 9 May 2017.

Please quote reference JR11375 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Lecturer in Children’s Literature at Newcastle University

Lecturer in Children’s Literature
Newcastle University – Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences – English Lit, Language & Linguistics
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne
Salary: £33,943 to £52,793 per annum
Hours: Full Time
Contract Type: Permanent
Placed on: 16 February 2017
Closes: 16 March 2017
Job Ref: 128897

The School of English Literature, Language & Linguistics wishes to appoint a Lecturer in Children’s Literature. Applicants may be specialists in literature for children in English without regard to period, region or mode. You will have experience in teaching children’s literature to students across a range of modules and a publications record in children’s literature with the potential to make a significant contribution to research within the Children’s Literature Unit.

Experience in research and/or teaching centred around archival materials is desirable. You will also have the capacity to support the ongoing development of the School’s highly successful partnership with Seven Stories: The National Centre for Children’s Books.

Informal enquiries can be made to Dr James Annesley, Head of School, James.Annesley@Newcastle.ac.uk or Professor Matthew Grenby, Matthew.Grenby@Newcastle.ac.uk.

The University holds a silver Athena SWAN award in recognition of our good employment practices for the advancement of gender equality. The University also holds the HR Excellence in Research award for our work to support the career development of our researchers, and is a member of the Euraxess initiative supporting researchers in Europe.

Apply here.

CFP – L.M. Montgomery and Reading

CFP: L.M. Montgomery and Reading
The L.M. Montgomery Institute’s Thirteenth Biennial Conference
University of Prince Edward Island, 21-24 June 2018

“I am simply a book drunkard. Books have the same irresistible temptation for me that liquor has for its devotee. I cannot withstand them.” –April 4, 1899 (from The Complete Journals of L.M. Montgomery: The P.E.I. years, 1899-1900)

“In spite of this proliferation of approaches to Montgomery, her fictions flourish in their original form. They continue to draw people from all over the world to the island of reading pleasure.” –Elizabeth Waterston, Magic Island: The Fictions of L.M. Montgomery

The 2018 conference invites research that considers “L.M. Montgomery and Reading” in all its forms and possibilities. The allusions in Montgomery’s novels and the richness of her own reading life raise a host of questions about the politics, history, culture, technologies, and practice of reading. In turn, fans and scholars explore what it means to read Montgomery as they continue to visit and revisit her novels and autobiographical work. Her enduring popularity continues to inspire translations and transformations that offer readers new ways to experience Montgomery’s texts.

This conference will also mark the 25th anniversary of the L.M. Montgomery Institute, providing an important opportunity to (re)read and reflect on the past and future of Montgomery scholarship and to explore how the presenters see themselves in a community of international, interdisciplinary, and interrelated readers.

The conference theme inspires topics including:

  • Reading politics and history in and of Montgomery’s works
  • Material cultures and the class implications of reading
  • Influence and intertextuality across texts including explorations of Montgomery’s literary allusions
  • Global experiences of reading classics
  • Literacy in all forms, teaching Montgomery texts, and reading education
  • The neurobiology and neuroscience of reading and the human capacity to read
  • Reading and ways of seeing, reading and visual culture, alternative reading methods
  • Reflections on and readings of Montgomery scholarship
  • Reading in translation, reading personally and culturally, and reading over a lifetime

Please submit 250-300-word proposals and short CVs to the submission form on the LMMI website (lmmontgomery.ca) by 15 August 2017. Proposals should not only clearly articulate a strong argument but they should also situate that argument in the context of previous Montgomery scholarship. All proposals are blind reviewed. Proposals for workshops, exhibits, films, and performances are also welcomed. For more information please contact Laura Robinson (lrobinson@grenfell.mun.ca) or Emily Woster (ewoster@d.umn.edu).

CFP – Calling Dumbledore’s Army: Activist Children’s Literature

CFP for 2018 MLA Panel – Calling Dumbledore’s Army: Activist Children’s Literature

Books can encourage children to question rather than accept the world as it is. Literature for young people can invite them to imagine a world where black lives matter, women’s rights are human rights, poverty does not limit one’s life choices, LGBTQ youth know they are loved, indigenous peoples’ rights are respected, the disabled have equal rights and opportunities, refugees find refuge, and climate change does not imperil life on this planet.

This guaranteed session (sponsored by the Children’s Literature Forum) examines children’s literature as a vehicle for social change. Subjects panelists might consider include (but are not limited to): children as activists, books aligned with social movements, satire or humor as catalyst for change, the repurposing of children’s culture as means of expressing or inspiring adults’ activism. Papers may cover any country or historical period.

The panel will convene at the Modern Language Association Convention in New York, which will be held from January 4 to 7, 2018.

Send 1-page abstract and 2-page CV by March 15, 2017 to Philip Nel philnel@ksu.edu.