Call for Chapters – Kids, Inc. to Andi Mack: The Disney Channel’s Tween Programming

Call for Chapter Proposals

“Kids, Inc. to Andi Mack: The Disney Channel’s Tween Programming” is a proposed interdisciplinary, multi-contributer volume examining the nature, history, and legacy of The Disney Channel’s programming for tweens from 1984 to present.

While The Walt Disney Company and its media texts (particularly its films) have been the subject of countless books and journal articles, little if any attention has been paid specifically to the Disney Channel, and particularly to its shows aimed at the tween market. When focus has been turned to the relationship between tweens and Disney, it has been almost exclusively production and distribution-based: how Disney markets to tweens, what tweens want to consume, and so on. This volume aims to build a picture of the “Disney Tween Universe” that is constructed on the Disney channel by examining, deconstructing, and interpreting the shows themselves.

What type of people make up the Disney tween universe – who is considered important within that universe? Does it exhibit racial and gender diversity? What types of stories are being told? How has that universe shifted over time? What, if any, changes have been made in the way Disney presents to tweens? Most importantly, what has this meant and continues to mean for tween audiences over the past 30+ years?

Submissions are welcomed that contribute directly to media studies, women’s and ethnic studies, feminist studies, sociology, psychology, history or related fields. Chapters should be both historical and deconstructive/interpretive in nature.

Please note that only live-action fictional programming is being considered, not animated programming or game shows.

Recommended topics/programs include, but are not limited to:

  • Disney Channel development timeline/history (moving from premium to basic cable)
  • Early Disney Channel tween programming (Kids Incorporated, Good Morning Miss Bliss, etc.)
  • The “Timberlake Era” (All-New Mickey Mouse Club, Flash Forward, etc.)
  • Late 90s Era (The Famous Jett Jackson, So Weird, etc.)
  • The “Raven Era” (Even Stevens, Lizzie McGuire, That’s So Raven, etc.)
  • The “Miley Era” (Suite Life of Zach and Cody, Hannah Montana, Wizards of Waverly Place, etc.)
  • Early 2000s Era (Good Luck Charlie, Jessie, Austin & Ally, etc.)
  • The “Revival” (Liv and Maddie, Girl Meets World, Bunk’d, etc.)
  • The “Zendeya Era” (K.C. Undercover, Stuck in the Middle, Bizaardvark, Andi Mack, etc.)

Topics could cover programs individually, or deal with an Era as a whole construct.

You are invited to submit a Word document with a brief bio of the author(s) (no more than 250 words, including titles and affiliations), the title of the proposed chapter, and an abstract (500-800 words). Proposals should be submitted via email attachment to Dr. Christopher Bell ( by May 1, 2018. Invited authors will need to submit full text by October 1, 2018. Final chapter length will be 5000-6000 words, and submitted chapters should not have been previously published, as the book will be peer reviewed.

CFP – Sociocultural Dimensions of Childhood

International Conference
Sociocultural Dimensions of Childhood
October 26-28, 2018, Sofia, Bulgaria
Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Studies with Ethnographic Museum

The researches in the field of childhood recently attracted the attention of a wide range of specialists in the sphere of history, ethnology, anthropology, sociology, psychology, philosophy, literature, legal studies, etc., resulting in the creation of an innovative interdisciplinary research cooperation. With the advancement of scholarly achievements, topics like age and life cycle, gender and family, social development and culture, human rights and children at risk, policies and social practices, become a central focus of interest. Crossing the methodological limits, scientists explore the historical, political, social and cultural development of children in the structures and contexts characteristic of different historical periods and geographical areas.

Guided by the belief that the study on childhood is one of the most important problems of the present day, the organizers aim to initiate a scientific dialogue within the framework of an international conference on the subject and to outline new perspectives for the analysis of historical and contemporary pictures of childhood at local, national, global, and intercultural level. The expectation is that such forum will accommodate research cases which will allow scholars to highlight this field and create conditions for its conceptualization in the new political, social and scientific contexts of our time. While discussions remain open to other topics, the conference intends to give rise to debates in several main thematic fields:

  • Childhood and Adolescence in European History, Politics and Culture;
  • Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Childhood. Theoretical and Methodological Aspects;
  • In the World of Children;
  • Children Within and Outside the Family: Parents, Relatives, Coevals, Friends;
  • Children and Migration. Socialization and Acculturation of Immigrant, Emigrant and Refugee Children;
  • Experiences and Memory of Childhood. War, Violence, Trauma;
  • Childhood and Folklore;
  • Children’s and Teenage Subculture: Past and Present;
  • Representation of Children and Childhood in European Cinema, Art, Music, Photography, and Literature;
  • Good Practices and Educational Policies in Raising and Upbringing of Children;
  • Disadvantaged Children and Children at Risk;
  • Children and the Museum.

In a special panel dedicated to the role and functions of the museum for the education and upbringing of children, for the first time an ‘on-line’ dialogue with representatives of the museums in the country will be carried out; by means of interactive presentations the local and regional museums will present their ideas and accomplishments in the field of museum work.

The broad international and interdisciplinary academic dialogue within the conference will provide an opportunity for presentation of theses, exchange of thoughts and discussion on current issues of the European societies. This dialogue among established and highly qualified and motivated young and senior researchers will contribute to enhance knowledge transfer and scientific ideas. The hosting of the conference by the Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Studies with Ethnographic Museum in Sofia – one of the leading Bulgarian research institutions, will support international cooperation in the field of humanities and social sciences. We hope to inspire and produce an interdisciplinary scientific discussion and a broad public debate on issues related to the rearing, upbringing and growing-up of the contemporary younger generation.

We encourage submissions by both established scholars and young scientists/advanced postgraduate students.

Please submit a proposal in English that contains your full name, e-mail address, institutional and disciplinary affiliation, the title of your paper and an abstract of not more than 300 words. The language of the conference is English.

Please send your proposals to the Secretary of the Organizing Committee Assist. Prof. Violeta Periklieva, PhD (

The deadline for the submission of proposals is March 31, 2018.

Participants will be informed about the acceptance/rejection of their proposals by April 15, 2018.

Further information on the programme, the terms of the conference, the paper requirements as well as the accommodation in Sofia will be sent by the end of June 2018.

The organizers intend to publish a collection of selected papers after the conference.

Note: There is no participation fee. Due to financial restrictions, we are strongly encouraging the future participants to search for potential financial support from their sending institutions as well as to take advantage of the programmes for inter-academic exchange. Participants are expected to cover their travel and accommodation expenses.

CFP – Special Issue of Social Sciences: Childhood and Society

Special Issue of Social Sciences: “Childhood and Society”
Guest Editor: Prof. Michael Wyness
Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

The “social” turn in childhood studies in the late 20th century has challenged a powerful orthodoxy within the social science, moving our understanding of childhood away from narrowed schooled and developmental models towards more diverse and globalised conceptions. Moreover, the rights agenda, the international focus on the exploitation of children and the recurring concerns of global child poverty have generated a more globalised frame within which we can make sense of children’s lives. This is a multi-faceted often contradictory field of study. Issues of protection elide with a global agenda of entitlements. At the same time, political concerns for children’s wellbeing have to compete with conceptions of childhood and practices with children that highlight their social agency. The structure/agency antinomy is a recurring theme within the social studies of childhood.

A second and associated theme within the field is the shift from a modernist 20th century version of childhood towards a post-modern 21st conception of childhood. Research identifies important continuities between the two conceptions. There is also a developing body of work that explores more nuanced differences between the two: the subtle move from a dependent and “becoming” status towards an emphasis on social agency and legal and institutional independence. Arguably, now there is greater recognition children’s important and sometimes vital social and economic contributions.

A third cluster of ideas on the social nature of childhood is the heightened significance of generational relations. Generation has a greater theoretical importance now in studies of children and childhood. While it does not compete with grand narratives on social class and gender, analyses of social differentiation and inequality have been refined by work that explores the contemporary nature of relations between adults and children. At the same time, the contemporary importance of generational relations is also a reflection of greater adult fears and anxieties over children’s welfare. Social studies of childhood have responded to these claims through analyses of the ways that children in concert with adults refine as well as challenge generational relations.

In this Special Issue, we invite empirical and theoretical papers that engage with these contemporary research themes. Childhood is fundamentally a multi-disciplinary field of study. We welcome submissions from sociology, anthropology, politics, policy studies, criminology and technology. More specifically, these broad themes may be articulated through the following focal points and questions:

  • Continuity and change between 20th and 21st century conceptions of childhood
  • Contemporary conceptions of childhood innocence
  • Is there a global childhood?
  • Family structures and inter-generational relations: theoretical and empirical work on children’s changing social relations
  • Marginalised children: when does deviance become agency?
  • Generational relations and inequalities
  • Childhood and digital peer relations
  • Are children’s voices currently being heard?

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at by registering and logging into this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

CFP – Special Issue of IRCL: Curating National Histories (Updated)

Paper Call for a Special Issue of International Research in Children’ Literature: Curating National Histories

Canonical, national, classic: all these terms imply quality with regard to children’s literature, but too often these labels ignore the forces of privileging a dominant group’s work over all others. Because the reifying of children’s literature means longer shelf-life, sales, and interest, the public curation of a nation’s children’s literature matters. An increase in global migration (for both economic and political reasons), shifting international relationships, and isolationist and nationalist movements around the world suggest that now is a useful moment to focus on the question of the composition of national children’s literatures. How are such histories compiled, and who has a stake in the creation, promotion, and maintenance of the idea of a national history of children’s literature? What voices are left out? Are there ways that non-dominant groups can usefully intervene in the curation process ensuring that a national children’s literature represents the nation? Guest editors Dr. Lucy Pearson, Dr. Aishwarya Subramanian, and Professor Karen Sands-O’Connor invite abstracts for papers on the theme of the curation of national histories of children’s literature. We are particularly interested in papers that consider how or if non-majority groups within a nation find space/place within the national conversation about children’s literature, and how different stakeholders (publishing, education, award committees, museums and archives) play a role in the creation and marketing of alternative voices in the national children’s literature story.

Papers will normally be 5000-7000 words in length; we may consider shorter submissions where these represent scholarship in emerging areas.

Abstracts due: 1 March 2018; completed papers 1 September 2018, publication July 2019.

Abstracts (300 words) and a short bio (150 words) should be submitted to

CFP – Retrenching/Entrenching Youth: Mobility and Stasis in Youth Culture Representations on Screen

Conference Call: Retrenching/Entrenching Youth: Mobility and Stasis in Youth Culture Representations on Screen
University of Liverpool
4 – 5 June 2018

Confirmed Keynotes:
Professor Pamela Robertson Wojcik, University of Notre Dame
Dr. Timothy Shary, Southern New Hampshire University
Professor Karen Lury, University of Glasgow

In recent years the expansion of free trade, globalization and freedom of movement, has facilitated the emergence of immigrant youths who view themselves as transnational citizens (Maira 2004). Often travelling as tourists, migrant workers or students, these young people seek to live in different countries, experience new cultures, see new places, form new communities and/or find adventure. This freedom of movement has been reflected in young people’s films such as Love, Rosie; The Dreamers; An Education; What If; The Fault in Our Stars; Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants; The Inbetweeners Movie; Call Me By Your Name; Copenhagen; Bekas; Una Noche; Twilight: New Moon; Pitch Perfect 2; Pitch Perfect 3; Everything is Illuminated and Eurotrip; in television programmes such as Gossip Girl (season 4); Gilmore Girls (season 5); One Tree Hill (season 9); Degrassi: The Next Generation (Season 8) and Skins (season 2); as well as in Netflix series like Gilmore Girls (“A Year in the Life”).

The flow of media, goods and people across national borders and the formation of online communities have seen youth culture embedded within both national and global trends and happenings. Yet, As Stephen Castles, Hein de Haas, and Mark Miller note, “the growth of transnational society has given rise to novel challenges” (17). The strain of these challenges has been seen in both the Brexit and Trump campaigns and surprised victories, with immigration and tighter border control serving as a central issue in both campaigns. While in the British referendum and the American presidential election young people more commonly voted to remain in the European Union and against Trump and his values, this generation now faces tightening borders and heightened nationalism. In this conference, we aim to explore how contemporary youth culture has been shaped by these and other earlier developments such as, the global financial crisis, the increased visibility of terrorism in the West, and the intersecting ways in which industrial, economic, social, cultural and political factors have affected the representation of young people’s stasis and mobility on screen. Papers, panels and workshops are invited on but not limited to:

  • Youth Culture and (Trans)National Identity
  • Beyond Borders: Youth Culture and Online Communities
  • Travel in Contemporary Youth Film and Television
  • Youth Culture and the Media
  • Youth Literature and Travel
  • Group Commitment and Boundaries among Young People
  • The Changing Landscape of Borders and Youth Culture
  • Youth Culture and Brexit
  • Youth Culture and Trump
  • Youth Culture in the European Union

Please send queries and abstracts of 250-350 words, along with a brief bio of no more than 100 words, to by 18 March 2018. The conference chairs are Dr. Yannis Tzioumakis and Dr. Katherine Whitehurst at the University of Liverpool. Conference details can be obtained at:

CFP – Edited Collection: Essays on John Matthews Manly and Edith Rickert

Edited Collection: Essays on John Matthews Manly and Edith Rickert
Katherine Ellison
Deadline: 500-1,000 word abstracts due by July 1, 2018

Abstracts are solicited for an edited collection on the collaborations of John Matthews Manly and Edith Rickert, philologists, medievalists and early modernists, and cryptologists who worked as a duo on a number of groundbreaking projects from the eight volume Text of the Canterbury Tales to the Waberski Cipher. The goal of this volume is to survey the diverse body of work the two scholars created together across their careers, giving equal attention to their literary and cryptology expertise as well as their contributions to early composition and writing studies, linguistics, archival studies and bibliography, and educational theory. We are also interested in essays that analytically discuss the scholars’ personal lives and both private and professional relationships, for example with William and Elizebeth Friedman, George Fabyan, Elizabeth Wells Gallup, John Dewey, etc. As Chair of the University of Chicago English department, editor of Modern Philology, President of the Modern Language Association, and second-in-command of the Military Intelligence Division, section 8 (MI-8) during WWI, Manly’s institutional influences were wide, and Rickert led alongside him, often without deserved acknowledgement. This volume will bring together multiple perspectives on their careers and contributions to a wide range of fields, acknowledging a century of evolving scholarly reception of and speculations about their projects and collaborations.

We seek essays on all of the following topics, as well as intersections and influences not here identified:

  • the history of the highly reputable journal, Modern Philology, which Manly edited from 1908-1930;
  • Manly and Rickert’s training of students in paleography and influences on the future of that study;
  • the 8-volume Text of the Canterbury Tales and work in Chaucer studies;
  • contributions to scholarship on Shakespeare, including but not limited to their work toward debunking the Shakespeare-Bacon theory;
  • pedagogical materials in teaching beginning researchers and students archival and bibliographical methods;
  • pedagogical materials concerning composition and writing studies, including but not limited to The Writing of English (1919) and The Writer’s Index (1923);
  • pedagogical materials in the teaching and anthologizing of literature, such as Contemporary British Literature (1921), Contemporary American Literature (1922), and New Methods for the Study of Literature (1927), and the influences of their methods on the future of literary theory, particularly formalism, theories of authorship, and canonization and classification;
  • cryptology work on particular ciphers and development of methodologies;
  • general impact on early twentieth-century intelligence and military strategy;
  • creative writing projects, like Rickert’s The Reaper (1904), The Folly (1906), The Golden Hawk (1907), numerous short stories, and influences on fields like children’s literature;
  • institutional reform efforts for changing public and higher education; for example, ensuring equity in education, strengthening the interaction of the sciences and the humanities, or developing the English Studies model, which integrates rhetoric, writing, linguistics, literary studies, and the other disciplines of language;
  • the contexts of Manly and Rickert’s work within Midwestern Social Darwinist, Progressive, and agrarian Populist politics;
  • reformation of the functions of the Modern Language Association;
  • influences on models of collaborative scholarship and authorship;
  • Manly and Rickert’s actual teaching of and interactions with students; for example, Rickert was well known for her experimental teaching of contemporary literature, which she published in 1927 as New Methods for the Study of Literature.

Abstracts of 500-1000 words, with citations in Chicago style, should be sent via email to Prof. Katherine Ellison, Department of English, Illinois State University, at by July 1, 2018. Please send original proposals not under consideration in other venues.

CFP – Ancient Literature, Shahnameh “Epic of Kings,” and the Child

Ancient Literature, Shahnameh “Epic of Kings” and the Child
The First International Conference
10 May 2018, Mashhad, Iran
Organized by Dr. Khaleghi Mutlagh, world-renowned scholar and researcher of Shahnameh, professor at University of Hamburg, and managing director of Ferdowsi Foundation, and Professor Kanani, researcher and director of Ferdowsi Foundation

The Shahnameh, also transliterated as Shahnama, is a long epic poem written by the Persian poet Ferdowsi between c. 977 and 1010 CE and is the national epic of Greater Iran.

Possible topics for this conference include:

  • Familiarity of children with the literature of their homeland
  • Familiarity of migrant children with literature of their parents’ homeland
  • Rewriting of ancient literature for children

Abstracts and articles plus a biography of max. 100 words should be sent to:

Abstracts are due on 28 February 2018, and articles are due on 30 March 2018.

Those being selected will be guests of Ferdowsi Foundation for two days, and the selected articles will be translated for publication in international magazines and presented to related academic centres.

For more information, please visit the Ferdowsi Foundation website:

Inquiries can be sent to Masoumeh Mousavian:

CFP – Special Issue of Belas Infieis: Translation Studies and Children’s Literature

Call For Papers
Translation Studies And Children’s Literature

The consolidation of Translation Studies as a field of scholarly research, in the 1980s, is contemporary to the publishing of two pioneering works regarding children’s literature and translation: Gita Klingberg’s Children’s Fiction in the Hands of the Translators and Zohar Shavit’s Poetics of Children’s Literature, both from 1986. From then on, in Brazil and abroad, important events have taken place and numerous works have been dedicated to this subject, including monographs, theses, dissertations, articles, and books. Some of the themes that have arisen in the most recent events and publications are: (1) history of translation for children; (2) translating picture books and multimodality; (3) adaptations for children; (4) problems in translating cultural elements; (5) translation and morals; (6) the translator’s voice; (7) the child reader’s image; (8) the double addressee in translation of children’s literature, among others. Following up these advances, and aiming at cooperating with the consolidation of this field in Brazil, we invite researchers to present contributions in the form of articles, reviews, translations and interviews that discuss some of the above-mentioned topics, or others regarding translation and children’s literature.

Professor Álvaro Faleiros, Ph.D – University of São Paulo, Brazil
Professor Germana Henriques Pereira, Ph.D – University of Brasília, Brazil
Lia Araujo Miranda de Lima – Ph.D student; University of Brasília, Brazil

Deadline: FEBRUARY 20, 2019

All contributions must be sent only through the system of Revista Belas Infiéis:

For further information, please check the “Author Guidelines”:

CFP – Selling Childhood (MLA 2019)

Call for Papers
Modern Language Association Convention
Chicago, IL
January 3 – 6, 2019

Selling Childhood

Arguably, Western culture has been selling the concept of childhood from its inception. In the eighteenth century, figures like John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau persuaded their peers to buy the new idea that childhood constituted a distinct phase of human development.

Selling childhood quickly expanded from the realm of ideological persuasion to the one of consumer capitalism. After all, if childhood constituted its own unique period in the human life cycle, then it had unique material needs. During the nineteenth century, a large and lucrative industry of books, clothes, toys, and household items emerged to cater to the new specialty market of children.

By the dawn of the twentieth century, childhood was being sold in a myriad of ways: as nostalgia, as political rhetoric, and—amidst the rise of postwar youth culture—as coolness.

In the new millennium, the selling of childhood has reached a scale that is unprecedented in human history. Throughout Western culture, young people occupy the vanguards of material, popular, and consumer culture. Furthermore, after centuries of childhood commonly being sold as innocence, it has increasingly been marketed as sexiness.

Of course, during all of these eras, childhood has been sold not simply figuratively, but literally: via child labor, child trafficking, and child exploitation.

This guaranteed panel session examines the long, rich, and complicated history of selling childhood in the West. In so doing, it brings together past and present notions of this concept as an ideological, cultural, and, of course, capitalist commodity. How have Western concepts of childhood been regarded as transactional, from an intellectual, economic, historic, and/or socio-political standpoint? How has childhood been packaged, marketed, and sold over the centuries? Just as importantly, who has been buying it? Finally, how have technological developments—from photography and television to computers and smart phones—both helped to facilitate and provided sites of resistance to this phenomenon?

In considering responses to these and other questions, this panel invites examinations from a wide array of disciplines, including literature, popular culture, education, philosophy, childhood studies, economics, comics studies, media studies, age studies, sociology, cultural studies, political science, and history.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:

  • the selling of childhood as a highly raced, classed, gendered, and sexualized construct
  • the commodification of children’s literature and childhood culture
  • the role that technology has played in the way that childhood has been marketed, commodified, and consumed: photography, film, radio, television, computers, the internet, smart phones, YouTube, etc.
  • the use of children and childhood to sell products, ideas, and political agendas
  • marketing, advertising, and packaging intended for children
  • child trafficking
  • the selling of childhood as nostalgia to adults
  • modes of resistance to selling childhood—how have individuals, groups, movements, cultures, and even young people themselves questioned, challenged, and even outright rejected this phenomenon
  • the hegemonic promotion of specific understandings of childhood in certain time periods, cultures, nations, regions, and communities
  • children and consumerism; the child consumer
  • the relationship between selling and exploiting childhood
  • the longstanding use of child characters in comics as a means to sell newspapers
  • the radically different ways that childhood has been intellectually, economically, and culturally sold over the centuries: as innocence, as coolness, as sexy, etc.
  • child labor
  • shifting ideological understandings of childhood and their battles for ascendency

Send 500-word paper proposals and a 2-page CV by March 1, 2018 to Michelle Ann Abate, Accepted panelists must become members of MLA by April 1, 2018.

CFP – Sesame Street at 50 (MLA 2019)

Call for Papers: Sesame Street at 50 (MLA, 2019)
Deadline: March 15, 2018

In 1969, Sesame Street made its debut on PBS in the U.S. It has since become not just an American institution, but an international one — broadcast in 150 countries, and in over 30 languages. This show — as cross-media and transnational phenomenon — is thus an ideal subject for the Modern Language Association’s textual transactions theme, as it invites us to think transnationally about “intellectual, artistic, and pedagogical work.” This panel invites papers on Sesame Street as a site of transaction — creative, cultural, educational. Possible areas of inquiry include but are not limited to:

  • How the programme’s many international iterations interact with the original concepts and their particular audience.
  • The show’s many political initiatives, both within and beyond the U.S. Since the first international co-productions in 1972 (Brazil’s Vila Sesamo and Mexico’s Plaza Sesamo), co-productions throughout the show’s history have promoted many social justice initiatives through Sesame Workshop International, including the introduction of HIV positive muppet Kami in the South African version (Takalini Sesame), and the Kosovo co-production (Rruga Sesam/Ulica Sezam) that supported the peace process between Albanian and Serbian children.
  • How Sesame Street’s many changes in the past five decades respond to the media landscape it inhabits. Sesame Street now has a popular YouTube channel, and as of 2016 its first-run episodes air on HBO, not PBS.
  • How the Muppets’ comic mode of engagement often upends the concept of a distinct audience constituted solely of child viewers, and challenges protectionist discourses around what are considered “appropriate” media texts produced for young audiences. While the history of Sesame Street has situated the Muppets as part of a public mandate geared at preschool children (Davis; Reimer), the parodic, vaudevillian, and often subversive humor that characterizes the Muppets (Abate; Schildcrout) have been central features throughout the history of Sesame Street’s programming.
  • How Sesame Street inhabits a dynamic position within popular culture, particularly how characters have been remixed and/or deployed politically (for example, Bert and Ernie and marriage activism).
  • Sesame Street‘s role as a surrogate caregiver, especially via its recognition of the complex emotional lives of children. Beginning with the death of Will Lee (the actor who played Mr. Hooper) in 1983, Sesame Street has been a leader in children’s television for dealing with serious subjects: death, down syndrome, autism, loss and grief following 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, children with incarcerated parents, children in military families coping with a parent’s deployment.

If accepted by the MLA, the panel will convene at the Modern Language Association Convention in Chicago, which will be held from January 3 to 6, 2019.

Send 1-page abstract and 2-page CV by March 15, 2018 to Philip Nel ( and Naomi Hamer ( Posted in calls for papers