NEWS: Innovation and Experimentation in Portuguese Picturebooks

On behalf of the members of The Centre for Research on Children’s and Young Adult Literature at the University of Wrocław, members are invited to Professor Ana Margarida Ramos’ online lecture, Innovation and Experimentation in Portuguese Picturebooks, the fourth talk in the “International Voices in Children’s Literature Studies” series, to be held on October 13, 2021, at 6 p.m. Warsaw time.

In recent years, the quality and diversity of Portuguese picturebooks has been internationally recognised and acknowledged with several important awards; indeed, new creators are being distinguished for their increasingly elaborate and complex proposals which challenge the traditional relationship between the reader and the picturebook.

This presentation identifies the main contemporary trends in Portuguese picturebooks in order to characterize their recent revolution.  These trends include the introduction of elements of surprise, humour, challenge, and reflection; the growth of the illustration inside the picturebook and its displacement into other parts of the book; the investment in playfulness via the introduction of visual games, intertextual readings, parody, visual narratives, and parallel stories; the creation of an original and easily identifiable personal style (a kind of visual signature); and the creation of special art reading objects that highlight the importance of book design.

When: October 13, 2021 at 18:00 (CET)

Where: Microsoft Teams*

*If you are interested in taking part in the lecture, please contact us by email by October 10 at mateusz.swietlicki@uwr.edu.pl

CFP: Dreams

In past years, the International Committee of the Children’s Literature Association has organized a special panel focusing on children’s and young adult literature from a specific country at the conference. This year, we are hosting a themed panel at the ChLA annual conference to be held in Atlanta, Georgia from June 2-4.

To that end, we seek paper proposals on the topic of “Dreams” that approach this theme from an international, non-Euro-American perspective. Preference will be given to papers that examine texts originally written in languages other than English and/or created by authors and illustrators from communities beyond Anglo-American children’s and YA publishing traditions, including global indigenous communities. Topics could include but are not limited to the following:

  • Dreams as the vision of what is possible, including political / social change
  • Children’s dreams, aspirations or nightmares (literal and figurative)
  • Adults’ dreams or visions about childhood
  • Dreams as expressions of cultural desires, aspirations or fears
  • Dreams as a narrative device (“it was all just a dream”)
  • Dreams and storytelling as imaginative work
  • Freudian understandings of dreams as “wish fulfillment” as well as other interpretive paradigms that come from non-western traditions
  • Symbolism and meanings of dreams in various cultures (e.g. Dreamtime)
  • Dreams of other places, spaces, and opportunities
  • Dreams as a way of memorializing/recovering the past
  • Dreams as a way to make sense of or to re-imagine selfhood
  • Dream worlds vs lived realities
  • Inter-generational dreams/visions
  • Dreamers and visionaries

Since there might be an option to present at the conference virtually, we encourage scholars and students who are based outside of North America to submit proposals.

Please submit a 350-word abstract and a 200-word biographical statement with the subject line, “ChLA 2022 Themed Panel Submission” to nithya.s@txstate.edu by 11:59 p.m. (Pacific Standard Time) September 30, 2021.

Two abstracts will be selected, and the authors will receive “The ChLA International Honor Award,” which includes a grant of $500 each to cover expenses related to the conference (such as the membership and registration fees). Those papers selected for the International Focus panel will accompany a presentation by the Distinguished Scholar who will be invited by the committee to present at the conference.

Authors of proposals selected for the panel will be notified by October 10, 2021.  The International Committee encourages those scholars who are not selected for the Themed Panel to submit an abstract through the general Call for Proposals so that international children’s literature will become part of other panels at the conference.

The deadline for general submission to the ChLA 2022 Annual Conference is October 15, 2021.

NEWS: First Online Series on Translation for Children and Young Adults at NUI Galway

Starting: October 27, 2021, running monthly

Register online: https://forms.gle/3fXdyw1QemNAA5Pu5

Funded by the Athena Swann Scheme in the College of Arts, Social Sciences and Celtic Studies at NUI Galway, six webinars on translation for children and young adults organised by Dr. Pilar Alderete Diez (NUI Galway) will take place monthly, kicking off in October.

All talks are free to attend, and are followed by a discussion and conversations will start at 6:00pm GMT and finish at 7:30pm GMT.

October 27, 2021 – MS. NOEMI RISCO

http://www.noemirisco.me/p/mis-traducciones.html

November 24, 2011 – PROFESSOR ZOHAR SHAVIT

https://english.tau.ac.il/profile/zshavit

December 22, 2021 – DR. VANESSA LEONARDI

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Vanessa-Leonardi

January 26, 2022 – DR. OWEN HARRINGTON-FERNANDEZ

https://researchportal.hw.ac.uk/en/persons/owen-harrington-fern%C3%A1ndez

February 23, 2022 – MR. MUIRIS O’RAGHALLAIGH

http://otherwordsliterature.eu/eng/blog/muiris_o_raghallaigh_children_s_books_from_ireland_dutch_foundation_for_literature

March 23, 2022 – PROFESSOR EMER O’SULLIVAN

https://www.leuphana.de/institute/ies/personen/emer-osullivan.html

CFP: “City in a Forest”

Atlanta holds any number of monikers—Hollywood of the South or the Cradle of the Civil Rights Movement, for example. Indeed, local residents also refer to Georgia’s state capital as the “City in the Forest.”

And so, for ChLA 2022: Atlanta, the first in-person meeting of the Children’s Literature Association since 2019, we’d like to grapple with the questions, contradictions, and possibilities that arise in considering the concept of a “City in a Forest” within the context of young people’s literature and media.

Children’s literature scholars have long grappled with the ways in which young people have been associated with the natural world, whether that be to nostalgize an idyllic, pastoral past or to emphasize youth’s wild, untamed behavior. But children are also used in culture as markers of the future, which is often conflated with progress, industry, and metropolitan spaces.

As Rebekah Sheldon notes, “The child became legible not only as a record of the past but as the recipient of a specific biological inheritance freighted with consequences for the future.” The figure of the child, in other words, becomes a site of promise, possibility, and protection.

Critics have explored the implications of an ideological nexus between city and nature on many fronts, from perspectives of environmentalism to that of hybridity. As we ponder relationships between the city and the forest within and beyond children’s literature, we can also look to and learn much from Afrofuturism, Indigenous futurisms, and other frameworks that explore the ecosystems of individual and social identity.

We see this in Melissa Jenkins’s study of the flying motif in Black picture books. Jenkins identifies how characters make sense of the divides between country and city, past and future in the ways that they “map, mark, and delineate as part of pointed socioeconomic critiques, responding to the difficulties of urban life by expanding the accepted geographies of black experience and politicizing projects of urban ‘uplift.’” While in The Marrow Thieves by Cherie Dimaline (Georgian Bay Métis Council), the central characters travel through trees surrounding dystopian urban spaces, finding and creating renewal most profoundly amid a type of Indigenous “city in the forest” where they join like-minded resisters, explains Patrizia Zanella.

Such narratives exist within and around Atlanta, a city marked by contradiction, trauma, and prosperity. It wrestles with how to negotiate its past with its present, and continues to experiment with future paths that will both support a diverse metropolitan area and embrace its natural environs. For instance, Clarkston, a suburb of Atlanta, has the highest number of refugees per capita in the United States, and many local refugee organizations focus their efforts on creating community spaces that take advantage of Atlanta’s “forest”—community gardens, co-ops, and summer camps for children. But stories of the refugee experience also take into account the hardships of landscape, such as Linda Sue Park’s Long Walk to Water or Fabio Geda’s In the Sea there are Crocodiles. Nature can be a source of terror and solace in stories of refugees, and we encourage papers that explore this unique Atlanta population.

We invite proposals that examine, from any number of angles or interpretative lenses, this concept of “City in a Forest” within children’s and young adult literature, media, and culture. Papers might address:

  • Utopian and dystopian spaces
  • Trees as characters or central story locations
  • Nature and nostalgia
  • Literature or media about or set in Atlanta
  • Atlanta as liminal space
  • International and farmer markets within cities
  • Afrofuturism
  • Migrant experiences in urban and rural settings
  • Steampunk
  • Food justice and accessibility
  • Reproductive futurity
  • Racial and queer ecologies
  • Ideas of hybridity
  • Nature as an idyllic past or future
  • Fantasy as a space that explores/complicates nature
  • Garden and greenery landscapes in the city
  • Post-apocalyptic landscapes and cityscapes
  • Stories of the displaced or refugee populations
  • Posthumanism and ecopoetics
  • Relationship between urban and rural in Civil Rights Movement

Additionally, given the welcome response to the introduction of pedagogy posters at ChLA 2021, we invite proposals for these for ChLA 2022 as well. Pedagogy poster proposals may be submitted in addition to or instead of paper proposals. They should focus on specific approaches to teaching children’s / YA literature or media and provide take-away ideas for adoption/adaptation into the classroom.

Proposals may be submitted here.

Deadline for proposals: October 15, 2021

The 49th Annual Children’s Literature Association Conference, “City in a Forest,” will take place June 1 – June 4, 2022 in Atlanta, GA.

Please note that papers previously accepted for Seattle 2020 may be presented in Atlanta or may be held over for Seattle 2023, which retains the same 2020 CFP.

CFP: 53rd Annual Georgia Conference on Children’s Literature

We are excited to be organizing a face-to-face conference for March 18–19, 2022 after having had an online conference last year. Our 53rd Georgia Conference on Children’s Literature will have a great line-up of authors and illustrators, as well as an exciting list of sessions.

The two-day conference will be held at the UGA Center for Continuing Education & Hotel and is organized by the Department of Language and Literacy Education.

But we need you to make it happen!

We are now accepting proposals for breakout sessions at our 2022 conference. We welcome submissions from teachers, school library media specialists / librarians, graduate students, college faculty, authors, illustrators, and others with knowledge and enthusiasm to share about the field of children’s / young adult literature.

Abstract is limited to 50 words (this is what will appear on the conference program).

Paper or presentation description is limited to 250 words.

All papers must be original.

While breakout sessions are open regarding theme, they usually address one of these four areas:

  • Children’s / YA literature in the classroom
  • Children’s / YA literature as life inspiration
  • Public libraries and children’s / YA literature
  • Inquiry into children’s / YA literature

NOTE: Acceptance notification will be available early December 2021. If your proposal is accepted, all presenters and co-presenters are required to register for the conference (including registration cost) by the early registration deadline (date TBD) in order to be included on the program and present at the conference.

Please submit your proposals here.  We look forward to receiving your proposals!

Deadline: October 31, 2021

NEWS: Book Launch Event – Growing Up with America

Please join Emily Murphy on Wednesday, 1 September from 4-5pm (UK time) for the launch of her new book, Growing Up with America: Youth, Myth, and National Identity, 1945-Present.

The event will include a presentation by Emily herself on “The Myth of American Adolescence,” and will followed by commentary by Donald Pease and Julia Mickenberg, along with a Q&A session.

The event is free and will be hosted on Zoom. You can register to reserve your space here.

Author Bio

EMILY MURPHY is a lecturer in children’s literature at Newcastle University. She has published in Children’s Literature Association Quarterly; the Lion and the Unicorn; and Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures. Her essays also appear in Prizing Children’s Literature: The Cultural Politics of Children’s Book Awards and Connecting Childhood and Old Age in Popular Media.

Book Abstract

When D. H. Lawrence wrote his classic study of American literature, he claimed that youth was the “true myth” of America. Beginning from this assertion, Emily A. Murphy traces the ways that youth began to embody national hopes and fears at a time when the United States was transitioning to a new position of world power.

In the aftermath of World War II, persistent calls for the nation to “grow up” and move beyond innocence became common, and the child that had long served as a symbol of the nation was suddenly discarded in favor of a rebellious adolescent. This era marked the beginning of a crisis of identity, where literary critics and writers both sought to redefine U.S. national identity in light of the nation’s new global position.

The figure of the adolescent is central to an understanding of U.S. national identity, both past and present, and of the cultural forms (e.g., literature) that participate in the ongoing process of representing the diverse experiences of Americans. In tracing the evolution of this youthful figure, Murphy revisits classics of American literature, including J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye and Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita, alongside contemporary bestsellers.

The influence of the adolescent on some of America’s greatest writers demonstrates the endurance of the myth that Lawrence first identified in 1923 and signals a powerful link between youth and one of the most persistent questions for the nation: What does it mean to be an American?

NEWS: The Swedish Institute for Children’s Books Welcomes Applications for the Solkatten Research Grant 2021

The application for the Solkatten Research Grant 2021, funded by the Astrid Lindgren Foundation Solkatten, is now open.

Since 2001, the Astrid Lindgren Foundation Solkatten has distributed a grant that gives foreign researchers on children’s and youth literature the opportunity to conduct research in Sweden, or Swedish researchers the opportunity to work abroad. The grant is distributed annually and is administered by the Swedish Institute for Children’s Books.

This year’s grant of 40,000 SEK is reserved for foreign researchers. Professors and research leaders are kindly asked to submit nominations by 8 September 2021.

For more information about the grant, please see https://www.barnboksinstitutet.se/uncategorized/the-research-grant-of-the-astrid-lindgren-foundation-solkatten-2/.

NEWS: IRSCL Congress Aesthetic and Pedagogic Entanglements

We are happy to announce that registrations for the upcoming congress of our research society, Aesthetic and Pedagogic Entanglements, are now open.

Those of you who are IRSCL2021 delegates will receive an announcement similar to this one, but in this opportunity, we wished to reach out to IRSCL members who did not submit a proposal for the congress.

IRSCL2021 will take place virtually from October 19 to the 29th. The event will be powered by Whova, a virtual platform that specializes in participative gatherings with similar magnitudes to our congress. Whova will provide participants with access to the event’s schedule in their corresponding timezone, with the chance of adding presentations to their personal calendars, and also feature an array of social activities that go beyond zoom presentations (discussion forums and user-led events, among other features to be announced further on).

IRSCL members will be entitled to register as audience in the congress for free, but you do need to register: please visit our registration page, and fill in the registration form entering the discount code “IRSCLMEMBER21.”

The deadline for audience registrations is October 10th!

If you have any questions about the registration process, do not hesitate to contact Congress Coordinator Ja’nos Kovacs (jskovacs@uc.cl). He will be happy to assist you.

We are looking forward to seeing all of you in October!

CFP: Dimensions of Multiculturality in the Latest Works for Children and Young Adults

The challenges of the 21st-century related to the nature and dynamics of diverse intercultural relations are becoming increasingly evident, both in Poland and in the world. They are reflected, among others, in various works for children and young adults. Literary works, films, television series, comic books, theatrical performances, or video games presenting issues of multiculturality have the potential to raise awareness of the importance of specific social problems, occurring both locally and on a global scale.

By inviting you to reflect on contemporary strategies for constructing images of multiculturality in various media targeted at children and young adults, we suggest it to be considered broadly. This category, which in research on works for young audiences includes mainly reflections on the relationships of ethnic and ‘racial’ groups, is nowadays increasingly often based on a capacious definition of culture.

A decade ago, in 2011, Ambika Gopalakrishnan in the monograph Multicultural Children’s Literature: A Critical Issues Approach stated that multicultural children’s literature draws from the social and cultural experiences of groups that were previously underrepresented, and its aim is to show the significance of these experiences, resulting from differences not only in ‘racial’ and ethnic origin, but also in gender, psychosexual identity, class, age, economic status, (dis)ability, etc. Earlier, in 2009, Maria José Botelho and Masha Kabakow Rudman in Critical Multicultural Analysis of Children’s Literature: Mirrors, Windows, and Doors signalled that the category of ‘race’ cannot be viewed in isolation from the power relations resulting from class and gender inequalities, since any “cultural difference” is a historical and socio-political construct.

The category of multicultural children’s literature appeared as early as the 1960s, and research on it – which at that time focused mainly on ‘racial’ and ethnic diversity – began to develop rapidly in the last decade of the previous century. Mainly analysed was national literature, especially created in the USA, Canada, and Australia (Rudine Sims Bishop, John Stephens, Junko Yokota, and Hazel Rochman, and in the 21st century, for example, Sharyn Pearce and Miriam Verena Richter). Perhaps the most cited – so far – are monographs by Mingshui Cai (Multicultural Literature for Children and Young Adults: Reflections on Critical Issues from 2002) and by Botelho and Kabakow Rudman (cited above).

Over time, scholarly works published in English ceased to concern only English-language literature, but began to take into consideration, for example, Spanish (the research of Macarena García-González), Greek (Meni Kanatsouli, Theodor Tzoka), Portuguese (Ana Margarida Ramos), Scandinavian (Ingeborg Kongslien), and Chinese (Chengcheng You) literature, as well as films and TV shows (Sharon Bramlett-Solomon and Yvette Roeder, Erynn Masi Casanova, Karen Wells). So far, only one monograph devoted (though not entirely) to literary studies of multicultural children’s and youth literature, edited by Bernardeta Niesporek-Szamburska and Małgorzata Wójcik-Dudek, has been published in Poland; in the book, individual authors analyse various aspects of literary images of cultural diversity, among others, from the perspective of translation studies, postcolonialism, gender studies and queer studies, as well as taking into consideration the goals of multicultural and intercultural education.

Krystyna Kamińska (W stronę wielokulturowości w edukacji przedszkolnej, 2005) and Przemysław P. Grzybowski (among others: Edukacja europejska – od wielokulturowości ku międzykulturowości, 2009; Edukacja międzykulturowa – konteksty. Od tożsamości po język międzynarodowy, 2012; Inni, Obcy – ale Swoi. O edukacji międzykulturowej i wspólnocie w szkole integracyjnej, 2018 – work written with Grzegorz Idzikowski) devoted their monographs to the last issue. Polish researchers have also published a dozen or so scholarly articles – on multi- and interculturality understood as ethnic, national, and ‘racial’ diversity – from the perspective of literary studies (Katarzyna Smoter, Beata Gromadzka, Joanna Żygowska, Weronika Kostecka, Wójcik-Dudek, Krzysztof Rybak, Marta Jadwiga Pietrusińska, Ewelina Rąbkowska, Anna Fornalczyk-Lipska) and pedagogy (Lucyna Sadzikowska, Karolina Wawer, Anna Janus-Sitarz).

In the past two decades, works have also been published presenting the results of research on the texts for children and young adults that present constructions of: disability (in Poland – mainly by Alicja Fidowicz, and abroad – Tamma Berberi and Viktor Barberi, Tina Taylor Dyches and Mary Anne Prater, Zana Marie Luttfiya and Nancy Hansen, Debra L. Minarick, Martin F. Norden, and Patricia A. Dunn), non-heteronormativity and transgenderism (Dominik Borowski, Katarzyna Reszczyńska-Urban, Danielle Glassmeyer, Gwendolyn Limbach, Tison Pugh, Amanda Putnam, Michelle Ann Abate and Kenneth B. Kidd, Derritt Mason), gender (Grażyna Lasoń-Kochańska, Adrianna Zabrzewska, Gael Sweeney, Roberta Seelinger Trites, Tricia Clasen, and Holly Hassel), age (Vanessa Joosen).

Macarena García-González in the monograph Origin Narratives: The Stories We Tell Children About Immigration and International Adoptions (2017) rightly noticed that narratives not only reflect certain ideologies, but also constitute them. This is why we believe that it is important to carefully study the strategies used by authors of texts for children’s and young adult culture. Therefore, we invite you to submit scholarly articles on the following topics, taking into consideration the above-mentioned broad understanding of multiculturality:

  • The ego-centric category of ‘otherness’ versus the equality-driven notion of diversity – ways of conceptualizing and presenting cultural differences in the 21st-century cultural texts for children and young adults;
  • Strategies for sensitizing young audiences to cultural diversity – by blurring or emphasising differences between specific groups, presenting various models of intercultural relations, creating an internal or external perspective of a multicultural community, etc.;
  • Ideological messages and methods of shaping the diegetic world in cultural texts – how do they show social reality? What do they enhance and what do they marginalise? Who do they give the voice to – and on what terms? What patterns of thinking do they reproduce and perpetuate, and which ones do they question and transform?

We also encourage you to send texts not related to the topic of the issue to the Varia and Review Articles sections.

To read more about the journal, including our submission procedure, please visit our platform, http://www.journals.polon.uw.edu.pl/index.php/dlk (to change the language to English, please click the ‘globe’ button at the top of the page.) We use APA style, British English, and publish articles up to 45 000 spaced characters.

You can also find us on Facebook: http:www.facebook.com/dlkuw/

Deadline for submitting articles: December 31, 2021

 

 

CFP: Nature Writing

Biodiversity, climate change, and the relationships between humans and animals, plants, and landscapes have been central themes in children’s and young adult literature and media for some years. Stories about friendships between children and animals bring animal characteristics and agency to the fore; climate fiction for young adults modifies post-apocalyptic scenarios and fantastic novels engage with discourses about trees, roots and their networks; nonfiction (picture) books aim to raise awareness of the beauty and diversity of life in forests, in the depths of the sea and on the edges of cities, sometimes in aesthetically advanced ways – to mention just a few examples of the trend evident in all genres.. The theme, it must be noted, has long been profitable for publishers and one for which ever new publications are issued, albeit frequently devoid of any innovative emphasis in content.

A look at current and historical children’s and young adult literature nonetheless shows that the perspectives of neo-materialist theory, cultural animal and cultural plant studies as well as eco-critically oriented literature and media studies can produce new readings or re-readings. It could be postulated that children’s literature has demonstrated, since the Romantic era, a special connection between children and nonhuman creatures, with the latter characterised by unconventional agency. In this respect, it tells alternative stories of human–nature entanglements which are worth investigating.

Despite the conspicuous presence of nature themes, their analysis and reflection in children’s and young adult literature and media research remain a desideratum. Ecocritical approaches have so far been focused on the level of content and representation; beyond that, special attention has been paid to the development of didactic concepts in connection with a more sustainable lifestyle. But against the backdrop of New Materialism and the current animal turn and plant turn, a paradigm shift becomes apparent: New knowledge about the coexistence of humans and nonhuman beings is not simply represented in literature and media, but is produced descriptively and narratively or brought forth in visual, aural and audiovisual processes. “Writing nature” demands that we reflect upon hitherto circumventable anthropocentric positions of observation and narration. And while the discussion about climate change often remains abstract and oriented towards numbers, literature and media can find aesthetic means to model the changes in the natural environment and our shared world, to render the relations between humans and nonhuman beings narratable, and to make them tangibly experienceable. This kind of aesthetic work is of special interest here.

The sixth volume of the open-access, peer-reviewed Jahrbuch der Gesellschaft für Kinder- und Jugendliteraturforschung | GKJF (Yearbook of the German Children’s Literature Research Society) will address the contemporary as well as the historical dimensions of relationships to nature and landscape in children’s and young adult literature and media, especially the processes of writing nature.

Contributions should address the manifold implications of this complex topic from both theoretical and object-oriented perspectives in its various narrative and medial forms (novels, short prose, poetry, plays, picturebooks, nonfiction, comics, graphic novels, audio media, films, TV series, computer games).

Contributions may be in German or English. And while articles on German children’s literature and media are particularly welcome, the editors also welcome proposals on other cultural and linguistic areas.

Possible topics, aspects, approaches and focal points, each with reference to children’s and young adult literature or media, are:

  • Nature writing
  • Ecocritical approaches
  • Neomaterialist approaches
  • Narratology and knowledge
  • The interface between nature knowledge and esotericism
  • Utopia, dystopia
  • Fantasy and worldbuilding
  • Nature and horror / dark idylls / ecohorror / weird fiction
  • Human–nature relations and gender
  • Materiality

Beyond the focus theme, the Yearbook will publish up to three open contributions – in German or English – on questions of children’s and youth literature and media from a historical or a theoretical perspective; proposals for these contributions are also welcome.

Please send a proposal of no more than 300 words for a contribution on the focus theme or for an open contribution by 15 September 2021. The proposal should provide a short summary of the questions being addressed, establish theoretical positions and name the main literature to which the contribution will refer.

Notices of acceptance and invitations to submit a full manuscript will be sent out, together with a style sheet, by 15 October 2021.

The contribution itself should not exceed 40,000 characters (including spaces, footnotes and bibliography), and should be submitted to the editors as a Word document by 01 March 2022.

We look forward to receiving your proposal. Please send it to: jahrbuch@gkjf.de.  The Yearbook 2022 will be published online in December 2022.