CFP: MLA 2022: Anima Mundi: Finding our Shared Ecological Experience in Non-environmental Children’s Literature

Heidi A. Lawrence, University of Glasgow

ChLA Non-Guaranteed Session
Anima Mundi: Finding our Shared Ecological Experience in Non-environmental Children’s Literature

In his landmark text, Radical Ecopsychology: Psychology in the Service of Life (2013 [2002]), Andy Fisher defines ecopsychology as a project through which humans may hopefully come to realize how our human psyche and the psyche the world around us, internally relate to “nature,” and how they are the “interior and the exterior of the same phenomenon” (Fisher 205) Theodore Roszak (1996) calls this shared anima mundi the “ecological unconscious” (320-21). For Fisher, this reunification of mind and environment is about “refusing all dualisms or splittings of reality (nonduality perhaps being ecopsychology’s main pivot), seeking integrations instead” (Fisher 205). This contrasts with Cheryll Glotfelty’s definition of ecocriticism as “the study of the relationship between literature and the physical environment” (1996: xvii). Instead, ecopsychology is the study of the relationship between human beings and their physical environment. The idea of a shared psyche (or soul) between humans and nonhumans, between the organic and inorganic, and between the occupants of Earth and the occupants of other planets and stars across the universe must, of course, be multicultural, or it will not succeed, argues activist Carl Anthony (Anthony 264). In order to understand how the human-nature relationship can be healing, ecopsychology must acknowledge and seek for healing for the many cultures and peoples who have been dispossessed environmentally (Anthony 267). The close relationship between humans and their ecosystems is present in many children’s and YA fantasy and highly imaginative novels. Elements of these relationships are also present in more realistic children’s and YA fiction spanning at least the last 150 years. And as the Anthropocene accelerates and is accompanied by increased climate-change denial, the question arises – how can those who resist the concept of climate change be reached in a personal way that might allow them to see past pain and shame and guilt to their shared experience with the tree in the local park, or with the clouds scudding past on a windy day? Reading, not with an eye for how literature and the environment are in relation, but with an eye for how humans and the environment are in relation, may provide insights into the multiplicity of experiences humans share with the world around them.
This non-guaranteed session will investigate the question of human embeddedness in the ecosystem in non-environmental children’s and YA literature, whether fantasy, highly imaginative, or strongly realistic. This may include picture books as well. Non-environmental texts are those without an obvious past, present, apocalyptic, or post-apocalyptic environmental agenda; such texts may more easily reach those who struggle to accept climate change through tapping into such things as childhood memories of outdoor experiences or favorite family stories of outdoor play.

Topics might include:

  • Non-traditional outdoor education in non-environmental children’s literature
  • Established kinship between children or adolescents and a particular part of their ecosystem.
  • Evidence of ecojustice in non-environmental children’s/YA literature.
  • Representations (or a lack of representations) of kinship between children and the ecosystem in marginalized communities.
  • Socially and culturally appropriate representations or issues of cultural (mis)appropriation in non-environmental children’s literature.
  • Multicultural non-environmental children’s books and representations of kinship with nature.
  • Children or adolescents empowered through kinship with any organic or inorganic figure/character/object
  • Imaginary friends derived from some aspect of the environment.
  • A life-sustaining psychological bond between a child or adolescent and some part of the environment.
  • Outdoor play as an established part of a childhood routine.
  • A sense of wonder implicit in the experience of the child or adolescent character
  • Healing or nurturing aspects of nature in the child’s life

By March 1, 2021: Please send 400-500-word paper proposals and a 250-word bio to Heidi A. Lawrence, Heidi.Lawrence@byu.edu
Please use the subject heading “MLA 2022: Anima Mundi CFP.” If possible, please use a valid academic email address or an email address that clearly contains your name and comes from an identifiable email service. These steps will help me verify that it is safe to open your email and attachments. Thank you very much.

CFP: Food and/in Children’s Culture

National, Internatinal and Transnational Perspectives
Università Ca’ Foscari, Venice, Italy
Department of Linguistic and Cultural Comparative Studies
Palazzo Cosulich – Zattere Dorsoduro, 1405, 30123 Venezia – Italy
6 – 9 April 2021

Food is a prominent element in children’s literature and culture. As Carolyn Daniel puts it, by reading about food children learn “what to eat and what not to eat or who eats whom” (2006, 4). In children’s narratives food can be, simultaneously, a mark of national identity, and a bridge between cultures, through which children can both learn about their own national culture and encounter other cultural identities and experiences. It can be a mark of kinship, but also a mark of difference and monstrosity, a symbol of desire, but also a vehicle of danger and death. Food scenes at times represent moments of intense pleasure for characters in movies, books, and different kinds of performances and, therefore, vicariously, for the reader/spectator, who becomes involved in what Gitanjali Shahani has called “food ekphrasis” (2018, 3) and consumes fictional banquets through vivid descriptions. At other times, these vivid descriptions may place before the reader/spectator/listener foods that are decidedly unappealing, at times monstrously so; and in some cases they may represent, equally vividly, scenes of hunger, poverty, and longing for unreachable food.

There are indeed few elements so multifaceted, counterintuitive, and contradictory as food, and its role in children’s literature and culture usually bears heavy ideological, political, and/or cultural connotations. This conference invites broad, interdisciplinary interpretations of this theme encompassing, but not limited to:

  • Children as eaters and/or food
  • Medicine and science: diets, “clean vs un-clean” eating, nutrition
  • Food and gender
  • Picturebooks: picturing food and food fantasies/nightmares
  • Period-specific perspectives (Early Modern, Eighteenth Century, Victorian and Neo-Victorian, post-War, contemporary …)
  • Food and the child body: normalized, codified, modified, rejected/accepted
  • Trans/national perspectives
  • Images of food and intercultural dialogues/issues
  • The press (childcare, cooking and house management magazines, children’s periodicals)
  • Eating at home and abroad (in institutions [hospital, workhouse, school …], in different countries, picnics, the family meal, feasts and special occasions …)
  • Magical food
  • Food fantasies/nightmares
  • Children, food, and the environment: climate change, ecocriticism, access to food based on class/nationality …
  • Expressing concern about food: alcoholism and temperance, food disorders, poverty and hunger

Confirmed keynote speakers include:

Emeritus Professor Peter Hunt, Cardiff University (UK)
Professor Nicola Humble, University of Roehampton (UK)
Professor Björn Sundmark, Malmö University (Sweden)
Dr Zoe Jaques, University of Cambridge (UK)

Please send abstracts of 300-500 words for 20-minute papers and a 100-word biography to the Conference Organizers, Dr Anna Gasperini and Professor Laura Tosi, at foodchildrenculture2021@gmail.com by 30 November 2020.
For further information, please visit the website FED – Feeding, Educating, Dieting

Note: the conference is envisaged as an in-person event; should this not be possible, an on-line version will be organized. We will provide updates about this in due course.

Position Posting: Senior Lecturer/Lecturer in Children’s Literature and Literacy Studies

College of Social Science

Institution: University of Glasgow, School of Education
Position: Senior Lecturer/Lecturer in Children’s Literature and Literacy Studies
Contract type: Full Time Permanent
Salary: Grade, level 8/9, £44,045 – £51,034/£52,560 – £59,134 per annum

The School of Education invites applications for the position of Senior Lecturer/Lecturer in Children’s Literature and Literacy Studies on the Research and Teaching Track.

The School of Education is a large and dynamic unit which brings together researchers with expertise across all sectors of education: formal and non-formal, pre-school through to higher, adult and community education. It offers undergraduate, postgraduate and CPD courses and hosts the Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change (ROC); the Centre for Research and Development in Adult and Lifelong Learning (CRADALL) and the St. Andrew’s Foundation for Catholic Teacher Education.

The School prides itself on the effective integration of teaching, research, theory, policy and practice. The key feature of its research is its commitment to placing educational research as part of an interdisciplinary agenda to support the development of more equitable societies in the spirit of social justice. The School aims to contribute to producing better places locally, nationally and globally, providing a major source of research-informed evidence that contributes to positive economic and societal impact.

The School is situated within the College of Social Sciences (CoSS) and we welcome applications from candidates keen to contribute to interdisciplinary research, scholarship and knowledge exchange, working collaboratively in taking forward the CoSS interdisciplinary research themes which are: Addressing Inequalities; Challenges in Changing Cities; Digital Society and Economy; Justice, Insecurity and Fair Decision Making; and Sustainable Development.

This post aligns with these themes in addressing inequalities by supporting and extending equitable literacy practices through local and global texts and also aligns with the theme of digital society and economy through including media and digital literacies.

The successful candidate will hold a PhD or equivalent in a related discipline with an extensive and established reputation in research and significant teaching experience in Children’s Literature and Literacy Studies.

This position is open ended and full time.

Informal Enquiries should be directed to Professor Evelyn Arizpe, Director of Culture, Literacies, Inclusion and Pedagogies RTG, email address: evelyn.arizpe@glasgow.ac.uk

Visit our website for further information on The University of Glasgow School of Education: https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/education/

Click here for the full posting.

Closing date: 03 August 2020. 

It is the University of Glasgow’s mission to foster an inclusive climate, which ensures equality in our working, learning, research and teaching environment.

We strongly endorse the principles of Athena SWAN, including a supportive and flexible working environment, with commitment from all levels of the organisation in promoting gender equity.

The University of Glasgow, charity number SC004401.

 

 

CFP: Yearbook of the German Children’s Literature Society 2021

Children’s and young adult literature and media offer a symphony or polyphony of sounds. The word “sounds” evokes a whole concert of related associations. The term relates to a spectrum of auditory phenomena that encompasses the complex areas of tone/sound, word/language and music as well as noises of all kinds. It also leads to questions of sensory perception(s) as well as to sound art, be it in classical, experimental or popular culture forms. Literary sounds range from the multifarious aspects of the lyrical (poems, lyrics, etc.) to questions of intermedial references in texts; specific sounds and soundtracks are also audible in children’s and young adult media.

But it doesn’t just thrum and throb in young adult novels; sounds are also audible in picturebooks, for example, and political and ideological messages can be transmitted in all medial forms via sound. Narratological aspects are showcased when the voice of the narrator, the childlike tone or the fast beat of a novel are alluded to. Sounds can be interwoven with speech melodies, introduced with foreign-language quotations or underlaid with montaged and collaged noises. The chirping and rustling of nature is depicted via sounds, the (literary, composed) symphony of the big city sets a sound monument to metropolises.

In media contexts, too – both in the field of acoustics and in visual media – sounds are of central importance. Hence the relevance of probing the connections between sound and media development as mirrored in all media products and practices for children and young adults.

The open access, peer-reviewed Jahrbuch der Gesellschaft für Kinder- und Jugendliteraturforschung | GKJF (Yearbook of the German Children’s Literature Research Society) 2021 will focus on the theme of Sounds, examining the historical and contemporary dimensions of this complex subject. Contributions to this fifth volume of the Yearbook should address implications of the topic in its various medial forms (narratives, picturebooks, comics, graphic novels, films, television, computer games and apps) from both a theoretical and material perspective.

Contributions may be in German or English. While contributions on German children’s literature and media are particularly welcome, the editors also welcome proposals on other cultural and linguistic areas.

Possible themes and approaches with reference to children’s or young adult literature or media are:

  • Linguistic forms, narrative forms, narratives;
  • Intermediality and materiality;
  • Visual media (especially picturebooks, graphic novels);
  • Interdisciplinary aspects of the sound arts;
  • Acoustic media;
  • Audiovisual media: films, series;
  • Sensory perception, emotional research;
  • Music and singing;
  • Political aspects, ideological implications (e.g. “right-wing rock”);
  • Anthropological issues.

Beyond the focus theme, the Yearbook will publish up to three open contributions – in German or English – on questions of children’s literature and media from a historical or a theoretical perspective; proposals for these contributions are also welcome.

Formalities:

Please submit a proposal of no more than 300 words for a contribution on the focus theme or for an open contribution by 15 September 2020. The proposal should provide a short summary of the questions being addressed, establish theoretical positions and name the main literature to which the contribution will refer. The contribution itself should not exceed 40,000 characters (including spaces, footnotes and bibliography), and should be submitted to the editors as a Word document by 01 March 2021.

Please send your proposal to: jahrbuch@gkjf.de

We look forward to receiving your proposal. A style sheet will be sent once your proposal has been accepted. The Yearbook 2021 will be published online in December 2021.

 Jahrbuch der Gesellschaft für Kinder- und Jugendliteraturforschung | GKJF     
Editors

Prof. Gabriele von Glasenapp, Universität zu Köln
Prof. Emer O’Sullivan, Leuphana Universität Lüneburg
Prof. Caroline Roeder, PH Ludwigsburg
Prof. Ingrid Tomkowiak, Universität Zürich

http://www.gkjf.de/ 

 

CFP: Non-Fiction Renaissance Due to the Climate Crisis?

 

Non-fiction renaissance due to the climate crisis?

Nordic Journal of Childlit Aesthetics is an international open access journal. The aim of the journal is to develop cross-disciplinary discussions on children’s literature and its interaction with other art forms.

We are currently inviting contributions to a discussion on the status and development of non-fiction for children and young adults.

The UN’s focus on the 17 sustainable development goals that all countries should achieve within 2030 has encouraged a vast range of activities. International climate conferences are inspiring local ones. Children are eager to participate. School strikes have spread worldwide. Thus, the interest in knowledge about the global climate and global ecosystems has reached a new level. Non-fiction for children ought to be a suitable source for such information, hence the questions: Has the climate crisis given rise to an increased production of non-fiction texts for children and young adults? What are the aesthetics of texts aimed to meet children’s need for knowledge?

In non-fiction books, the readers are often encouraged to perform learning activities. Digital media may offer interactive opportunities for participation. Thus, another question: Does a potential non-fiction renaissance take place in paper books or in digital media, such as enriched e-books, computer and application games, rather than in paper books? If so, how does the change of media influence the aesthetics?

Nordic Journal of Childlit Aesthetics is seeking articles discussing these questions.

We hereby invite submission of articles on themes related to non-fiction, such as, but not limited to, the following:

  • How, and to what degree, do non-fiction texts pay heed to the current political situation? What is the pedagogical approach in such texts?
  • Non-fiction for children today is venturing at a definition. What is it, what does it aim to do, and how?
  • Is children’s increased political activity and interest influencing non-fiction publications in number and form?
  • Non-fiction’s subjects: Are they new, or a slight twist on the old? Has the scientific level, target group and literary form developed accordingly?
  • Visual and verbal presentation styles: Do they adapt to traditional children’s literature, or to the documentary, or are they indebted to other influences? What are non-fiction aesthetics today?
  • In what media is non-fiction developing? In paper book, comics, picturebook, enriched e-books, literary computer games, picturebook applications, etc.

Submit your article or your idea for an article as an email attachment to redaksjonblft@gmail.com by 1 September 2020.

Do not include any contact information in the article itself. Please send the title of the article and a brief presentation of the author in a separate file.

Nordic Journal of Childlit Aesthetics accepts articles in Norwegian, Danish, Swedish and English. The journal uses double-blind review and publishes articles continuously.

The journal is designated scientific level 1 in NSD (Norway and Sweden), the Danish Ministry of Higher Education and Science’s Authorization list for serials (Denmark), and in Publication Forum (Finland).

For more information, see https://www.idunn.no/blft?languageId=2#/authors

 

 

CFP: Children’s Literature and Bildung Processes in the Age of Digitalization and Political Concern

Children’s Literature and Bildung Processes  in the Age of Digitalization and Political Concern

Nordic Journal of Childlit Aesthetics is an international open access journal. The aim of the journal is to develop cross-disciplinary discussions on children’s literature and its interaction with other art forms.

We are currently inviting contributions to a discussion on bildung processes.

This recurring research subject connects to changing views on the complex nature of the functions and aesthetics of literature for children and young adults. A renewed focus on bildung is called for by a multitude of new impulses, mainly the digital media development and recent demands on a political literary agenda.

Digitalization’s immense influence on children’s literature is visible in the increased visual and digital text forms with various demands on reader participation. Examples of the political agenda range from an outspoken critique of the lack of multicultural representation in children’s literature to ecocritical literary theory, which has recently inspired a vast number of literary analyses. The political trend is institutionalized at the governmental level in the white paper The Power of Culture Meld. St. 8 (2018–2019) Report to the Storting (Norwegian Parliament), which states that art and culture for children are expected to provide cultural formation and prepare children for participation in democratic, social and economic processes. Still, the value of children’s literature is measured through its aesthetic quality.

How do these mixed expectations influence the current understanding of what children’s literature should be and do? How are aesthetical, digital, ethical and political issues negotiated within the texts that they are constituted by?

Nordic Journal of Childlit Aesthetics are seeking articles on the following topics:

  • What tools characterize children’s literature in different media, and how do they affect the reader?
  • How and to what degree do bildung processes define children’s literature? What constitutes the bildung processes today? How do literary bildung structures relate to contemporary trends?
  • Whose experiences are presented in children’s literature? How? Who has a voice? How is reader and author identity formed? How do the identity processes relate to bildung processes?
  • (How) is the idea of literature’s bildung processes compatible with aesthetic quality and artistic freedom?

Articles exploring related topics may also be of interest.

Submit your article or your idea for an article as an email attachment to redaksjonblft@gmail.com by 1 May 2020.

Do not include any contact information in the article itself. Please send the title of the article and a brief presentation of the author in a separate file.

Nordic Journal of Childlit Aesthetics accepts articles in Norwegian, Danish, Swedish and English. The journal uses double-blind review and publishes articles continuously. The journal is designated scientific level 1 in NSD.

For more information, see https://www.idunn.no/blft?languageId=2#/authors

 

Second Volume of Yearbook of the German Children’s Literature Research Society Published

The second volume of the Jahrbuch der Gesellschaft für Kinder- und Jugendliteraturforschung (GKJF)/ Yearbook of the German Children’s Literature Research Society is now online: http://www.gkjf.de/publikationen/jahrbuch-2018-open-access/. Its focus is on “1968.” Contributions in German or English on this thematic focus are augmented by ones with a theoretical or historical focal point, and an extensive section with book reviews completes the 200-page issue.

Fifty years after this ‘paradigmatic’ caesura, the second volume of the Yearbook brings the cipher “’68” into focus to discuss historical and contemporary dimensions of this junction and to examine the manifold implications of the topic from theoretical and subject-oriented angles and in its different medial forms. It discusses these, thanks to international contributions, in a European context and reflects their significance for today’s children’s and young adult culture. It further illuminates previously explored terrain, develops new questions and critically reexamines established positions and texts.

Beyond this focus theme, and in line with the concept of the Yearbook, two fundamental theoretical and historical articles on questions of children’s literature and media present current research approaches and perspectives. The articles are followed by book reviews of some thirty academic titles.

The articles of the Yearbook are peer reviewed by members of an Advisory Board of twenty-four international experts to ensure the maintenance of the highest standards of research and transparency. The Yearbook is published as an open-access journal. Articles can be downloaded as individual PDFs at http://www.gkjf.de/publikationen/jahrbuch-2018-open-access/, and a PDF of the entire volume is also available for download.

The editors of the Yearbook are elected every two years at the GKJF’s annual general meeting. The current volume was edited by Ute Dettmar (Goethe-University Frankfurt/M.), Gabriele von Glasenapp (Cologne University), Emer O’Sullivan (Leuphana University Lüneburg), Caroline Roeder (PH Ludwigsburg), and Ingrid Tomkowiak (Zürich University).

New ISSCL Podcast – Come Away, Oh Human Child!: The Adaptation of Adult Texts for a Child Audience

IRSCL member the Irish Society for the Study of Children’s Literature is pleased to announce that its third podcast, which addresses the topic of adapting adult texts for children in the context of the work of two of Ireland’s most renowned authors (Jonathan Swift and W. B. Yeats), can be accessed at https://issclblog.wordpress.com/podcasts/.

In the podcast, Anne Markey explores the relationship between children’s literature and Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels in this, the 350th anniversary of the author’s birth, and Noreen Doody discusses issues involved in editing The Moon Spun Round: W.B. Yeats for Children.

Recent Publications by IRSCL Members

The following books by IRSCL members have been recently published or are forthcoming:

The Courage to Imagine: The Child Hero in Children’s Literature by Roni Natov (Bloomsbury, November 2017)

The act of imagining lies at the very heart of children’s engagements with literature and with the plots and characters they encounter in their favorite stories. The Courage to Imagine is a landmark new study of that fundamental act of imagining. Roni Natov focuses on the ways in which children’s imaginative engagement with the child hero figure can open them up to other people’s experiences, developing empathy across lines of race, gender and sexuality, as well as helping them to confront and handle traumatic experience safely. Drawing on a wide range of theoretical approaches from the psychological to the cultural and reading a multicultural spectrum of authors, including works by Maya Angelou, Louise Erdrich, Neil Gaiman and Brian Selznick, this is a groundbreaking examination of the nature of imagining for children and re-imagining for the adult writer and illustrator.

Imagining Sameness and Difference in Children’s Literature From the Enlightenment to the Present Day edited by Emer O’Sullivan and Andrea Immel (Palgrave, 2017)

This book investigates how cultural sameness and difference has been presented in a variety of forms and genres of children’s literature from Denmark, Germany, France, Russia, Britain, and the United States; ranging from English caricatures of the 1780s to dynamic representations of contemporary cosmopolitan childhood. The chapters address different models of presenting foreigners using examples from children’s educational prints, dramatic performances, travel narratives, comics, and picture books. Contributors illuminate the ways in which the texts negotiate the tensions between the Enlightenment ideal of internationalism and discrete national or ethnic identities cultivated since the Romantic era, providing examples of ethnocentric cultural perspectives and of cultural relativism, as well as instances where discussions of child reader agency indicate how they might participate eventually in a tolerant transnational community.

Figuring Korean Futures: Children’s Literature in Modern Korea by Dafna Zur (Stanford UP, 2017)

This book is the story of the emergence and development of writing for children in modern Korea. Starting in the 1920s, a narrator-adult voice began to speak directly to a child-reader. This child audience was perceived as unique because of a new concept: the child-heart, the perception that the child’s body and mind were transparent and knowable, and that they rested on the threshold of culture. This privileged location enabled writers and illustrators, educators and psychologists, intellectual elite and laypersons to envision the child as a powerful antidote to the present and as an uplifting metaphor of colonial Korea’s future. Reading children’s periodicals against the political, educational, and psychological discourses of their time, Dafna Zur argues that the figure of the child was particularly favorable to the project of modernity and nation-building, as well as to the colonial and postcolonial projects of socialization and nationalization.

Recent Publications by IRSCL Members

The following books by IRSCL members have been recently published or are forthcoming:

The Routledge Companion to International Children’s Literature edited by John Stephens (Routledge, September 2017)

Demonstrating the aesthetic, cultural, political, and intellectual diversity of children’s literature across the globe, The Routledge Companion to International Children’s Literature is the first volume of its kind to focus on the undervisited regions of the world. With particular focus on Asia, Africa, and Latin America, the collection raises awareness of children’s literature and related media as they exist in large regions of the world to which ‘mainstream’ European and North American scholarship pays very little attention.

The Routledge Companion to Picturebooks edited by Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer (Routledge, November 2017)

Containing 48 essays by leading and new scholars, this Companion is the ultimate guide to picturebooks. It contains a detailed introduction by the editor, surveying the history and development of the field and emphasising the international and cultural diversity of picturebooks. Divided into 5 key parts the book covers: concepts – from within picturebooks, but also applied from literary theory; genres – from baby books to picturebooks for adults – their relations to other forms such as comics and visual media; domains and theoretical approaches; and adaptations and media.

More Words about Pictures: Current Research on Picture Books and Visual/Verbal Texts for Young People edited by Naomi Hamer, Perry Nodelman, and Mavis Reimer (Routledge)

This volume represents the current state of research on picture books and other adjacent hybrid forms of visual/verbal texts such as comics, graphic novels, and book apps, with a particular focus on texts produced for and about young people. When Perry Nodelman’s Words about Pictures: the Narrative Art of Children’s Picture Books was published almost three decades ago, it was greeted as an important contribution to studies in children’s picture books and illustration internationally; and based substantially on it, Nodelman has recently been named the 2015 recipient of the International Grimm Award for children’s literature criticism. In the years since Words About Pictures appeared, scholars have built on Nodelman’s groundbreaking text and have developed a range of other approaches, both to picture books and to newer forms of visual/verbal texts that have entered the marketplace and become popular with young people. The essays in this book offer ‘more words’ about established and emerging forms of picture books, providing an overview of the current state of studies in visual/verbal texts and gathering in one place the work being produced at various locations and across disciplines. Essays exploring areas such as semiological and structural aspects of conventional picture books, graphic narratives and new media forms, and the material and performative cultures of picture books represent current work not only from literary studies but also media studies, art history, ecology, Middle Eastern Studies, library and information studies, and educational research. In addition to work by international scholars including William Moebius, Erica Hateley, Nathalie op de Beeck, and Nina Christensen that carries on and challenges the conclusions of Words about Pictures, the collection also includes a wide-ranging reflection by Perry Nodelman on continuities and changes in the current interdisciplinary field of study of visual/verbal texts for young readers. Providing a look back over the history of picture books and the development of picture book scholarship, More Words About Pictures also offers an overview of our current understanding of these intriguing texts.

Canon Constitution and Canon Change in Children’s Literature edited by Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer and Anja Müller (Routledge)

This volume focuses on the (de)canonization processes in children’s literature, considering the construction and cultural-historical changes of canons in different children’s literatures. Chapters by international experts in the field explore a wide range of different children’s literatures from Great Britain, Germany, Scandinavia, the Low Countries, Eastern and Central Europe, as well as from Non-European countries such as Australia, Israel, and the United States. Situating the inquiry within larger literary and cultural studies conversations about canonicity, the contributors assess representative authors and works that have encountered changing fates in the course of canon history. Particular emphasis is given to sociological canon theories, which have so far been under-represented in canon research in children’s literature. The volume therefore relates historical changes in the canon of children’s literature not only to historical changes in concepts of childhood but to more encompassing political, social, economic, cultural, and ideological shifts. This volume’s comparative approach takes cognizance of the fact that, if canon formation is an important cultural factor in nation-building processes, a comparative study is essential to assessing transnational processes in canon formation. This book thus renders evident the structural similarities between patterns and strategies of canon formation emerging in different children’s literatures.

Dans les rêves de grand-père by Jean Perrot (Albin Michel)

Jean Perrot quitte sa stature de spécialiste de littérature enfantine et dévoile ici son rôle de grand-père. Avec cet album, il livre à son petit-fils quelques poèmes, jalonnant les étapes de la naissance à l’envol de l’enfant devenu adulte. Attention, étonnement, goût du jeu, inquiétude, admiration… le grand-père dit, en quelques mots, les émotions et les sentiments ressentis sur ce chemin partagé. Des mots pétris d’écoute et de délicatesse, qui se chargent, au fil du temps qui passe, du sens de la vie et qui expriment cet art merveilleux d’être grand-père.