Call for Editors for Bookbird: A Journal of International Children’s Literature

Bookbird, Inc., the managing board of IBBY’s journal, Bookbird: A Journal of International Children’s Literature, seeks an editor or editorial team to take over from the current editor whose term of office finishes with the publication of the October 2018 issue. Bookbird is a refereed journal published quarterly by IBBY (The International Board on Books for Young People), and is distributed by the Johns Hopkins University Press.

The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) is a non-profit organization which represents an international network of people from all over the world who are committed to bringing books and children together.

The Bookbird editor(s) must have the following qualifications:

  • An appropriate level of experience in editing a journal or books to publication level.
  • An understanding of the publishing process and experience in working with copy editors, designers and printers. Previous experience in this area will be a definite advantage.
  • Evidence of a clearly defined interest in and knowledge of children’s literature in an international context.
  • An excellent command of the English language and a general ability to work with other languages and writers whose first language is not English. Proficiency in a language other than English will be an advantage.
  • A degree in an appropriate discipline, e.g. literature, languages, children’s literature, childhood studies, publishing or librarianship.
  • A sympathetic ability to work with and encourage authors from a wide range of cultures and different educational backgrounds.
  • Excellent Information Technology skills, in particular related to editing and publishing.
  • An ability to work within and keep to deadlines.
  • Commitment to the ideals of IBBY and an understanding of and empathy with the principles guiding the publication of Bookbird.
  • Have appropriate office/secretarial support.
  • A willingness to work closely with the board of Bookbird, Inc., the IBBY Executive Committee and the IBBY Secretariat.
  • Be available to travel internationally to designated meetings of Bookbird, Inc. and the IBBY Executive.

Editorial duties include:

  • Planning the content of each issue of Bookbird.
  • Sourcing and commissioning suitable articles.
  • Liaising with the Bookbird review panel and overseeing the refereeing process for each article.
  • Working with authors to improve their texts.
  • Working with the organizations and individuals that produce additional content for the journal, i.e. reviews, ‘Focus IBBY’, etc.
  • Editing content and overseeing the copyediting and proofreading of articles and dealing with illustrations and permissions.
  • Liaising with the designer and printer and managing each issue of the journal to print and ensuring that it appears on time.
  • Working closely with and informing the board of Bookbird, Inc. on editorial-related matters.
  • Promoting the overarching aims of IBBY through Bookbird.

The editor(s) are required to attend Bookbird, Inc. and IBBY Executive Committee meetings twice yearly in various venues around the world. These are held in March or April at the Bologna Book Fair and possibly in another location later in the year, usually during August or September. There is a modest budget available to cover hotel and travel expenses to these meetings.

The application deadline is 25 August 2017. Application review will begin on 1 September 2017 and the position will be open until filled.

It is expected that the incoming editor(s) will be in place by early 2018 to prepare the first issue of 2019 (January). The contract to edit Bookbird extends for four years subject to an initial period of approval.

This is an excellent opportunity for an ambitious and creative person or persons with a strong interest in international children’s literature to acquire invaluable experience. It is not a full-time job, and a small honorarium is paid. There is a separate budget for design, copyediting and for translation of articles, when necessary. The editor/editors will need to provide their own administrative back-up by way of office facilities and secretarial help. The editor(s) work from their own homes or offices and may be based in any country.

Applicants are expected to be familiar with Bookbird and with the aims of IBBY.

Interviews for the post are likely to be conducted by Skype or telephone with a follow-up interview in person.

Expressions of interest, including a detailed CV (resumé), a statement about the applicant’s vision for Bookbird and an outline of how the applicant would manage the processes involved in producing the journal are invited from suitably qualified persons. These should be sent by email to:

Valerie Coghlan, President of Bookbird, Inc.: bookbirdpresident@gmail.com
Ellis Vance, Treasurer of Bookbird, Inc.: Executive.Secretary@usbby.org
Evelyn Freeman, Member of the Board of Bookbird, Inc.: freeman.5@osu.edu

CFP – Special Issue of Global Studies of Childhood: Children and Popular Culture

CFP: Global Studies of Childhood
Special Issue: Children and Popular Culture
Guest Editor: Patrick Cox, Rutgers University

Childhood and youth are always contested notions, but perhaps nowhere more than in popular culture. Popular culture offers representations of children and youth as, among other things, wise, dangerous, evil, innocent, sexual, doomed, and in various states of “in progress.” Popular culture is also the broad site of much child agency, where children and youth produce texts from novels to YouTube channels to websites, blogs, and zines, frequently outstripping their adult contemporaries in technological savvy and communicative capability. Popular culture for children is by turns condescending to the youngest audience, crass, pedantic, and appropriated by adults for their own pleasure. Elements of popular culture are designed to educate and socialize children; others are manipulated by children as political activism. These turns call into question and trouble conceptions not only of “the child” but of “popular culture” itself and propose a compelling nexus of questions befitting both Childhood Studies and Popular Culture Studies.

In this special issue, authors are invited to consider intersections of popular culture by, for, and about childhood, both broadly construed. We will explore both the impacts of popular culture on youth and childhood and the very real impacts of children and youth on popular culture. All disciplinary approaches are welcome, including but not limited to textual and visual analysis, ethnographic work, studies of children’s popular material culture, historical readings, comparative analysis of texts, and consumer and communication studies.

Additionally, contemplations of the interstices between Childhood Studies and Popular Culture Studies as academic endeavors are encouraged. The two fields have been in limited conversation with one another, perhaps separated by epistemological and methodological concerns, yet the available data seems like a rich vein for insight. While both fields are multi-disciplinary and continuously evolving, Childhood Studies maintains very clear traces of its roots in social sciences, while Popular Culture Studies is still found more often housed in the Humanities. The two fields each have at their center subjects that have at times made it difficult for them to be taken seriously as sites of academic inquiry. With different questions at their core, how can the two fields interact? Put another way, how do we study this multitude of texts?

Topics for this special issue might include:

  • Popular culture and education, whether intentional or inadvertent;
  • Children’s popular culture as grown-up nostalgia;
  • Youth vs. adult perspectives on popular culture;
  • Children and youth as producers of popular culture;
  • New media as empowering or oppressive;
  • Capabilities for communication and interconnectivity;
  • Adult consumption of children’s popular culture;
  • Children’s consumption of decades-old popular culture;
  • Definitions of youth in popular culture;
  • Nostalgia through revivals and reboots;
  • Social media;
  • Diminishing space between children’s and adult popular culture.

The guest editor welcomes submissions of articles via the journal submission system on its SAGE Publishing site. See “Submission Guidelines” here: https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/global-studies-childhood#description. Journal information available here: https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/global-studies-childhood

Deadline for submissions: December 1, 2017.

Please send any queries to guest editor Patrick Cox at patrick.cox@rutgers.edu.

Course Mentor in Children’s Literature at Western Governors University

Course Mentor, Children’s Literature
Location: WORK FROM HOME, US
Job Category: Faculty, full-time (work from home)
Position Type: Full-Time/Regular
Apply Here

Job Description

The primary focus of the faculty at WGU is student learning. Because of our unique student-centric, competency-based approach, faculty serve in different roles compared to traditional schools and other online schools.

Course Mentors at WGU function in a professorial role as subject matter experts who assist students as they engage specific sections of the WGU curriculum. The type, length, and intensity of instructional method vary based upon student needs. Course Mentors help students with specific questions that arise and offer specialized instruction on challenging topics. Their primary focus is on bringing WGU courses of study to life through one-to-one or one-to-many forums. Course Mentors do not develop WGU courses, construct tests, or grade assessments independently, but may contribute subject matter expertise to a larger course design effort that includes national directors, instructional designers, program development managers, COS editors, product vendors, assessment/project designers, and others. Course mentor contribution to this team effort reflects the university’s disaggregated model. Their experience and training is specific to the courses they support. They are knowledgeable and can address issues related to a course, learning resource content, or an assessment.

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Provide expertise in the content area.
  • Respond to student inquiries about content, course of study, learning resource, or assessment.
  • Maintain current and active knowledge in the expertise area in order to bring examples and ideas to students.
  • Communicate professionally, relate well, and share a passion for the content in an effort to motivate a diverse group of students.
  • Coach students to competency development by asking open-ended questions, brainstorming next steps, and maintaining accountability.
  • Provide additional resources to students based on content expertise, while maintaining the students’ responsibility for task competency.
  • Empower students to develop competency by sharing a passion for the subject.
  • Provide relevant information on student tasks based on feedback from graders.

Monitor and manage a dynamic learning community

  • Respond to student questions within discussion threads in a timely manner.
  • Update assessment announcements and live webinar schedule as necessary.
  • Post university announcements including holidays, unique changes and vacations.
  • Respond to student questions generated through “Ask a mentor” in the learning community in a timely manner.
  • Upload and maintain links to recorded webinars (both with audio and as Powerpoints)
  • Remove inappropriate student posts in a timely manner.

Utilize technology based teaching platforms to aid students in the development of competencies

  • Bring the course of study to life with engaging live webinars or relevant recorded webinars that enhance expected competencies.
  • Provide a recorded “Getting Started” session for each course.
  • Provide a classroom environment conducive to learning and teaching using features in Adobe.
  • Organize concepts in a logical and understandable sequence, utilizing examples and student interaction to facilitate learning
  • Utilize innovative teaching techniques in order to meet student needs.
  • Be proficient using Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, and Powerpoint) to create course deliverables (i.e. presentations, study guides, and spreadsheets).

Provide personalized outreach to at-risk students in a way that fosters development of competencies

  • Use TaskStream reports to target students who have had a task sent back for revision.
  • Assist students with the task revision process by clarifying evaluator comments, clarifying task directions, directing students to learning resources, and teaching the skills needed to develop appropriate competency.
  • Collaborate with student mentors on strategies for supporting individual students.
  • Used failed first attempts to identify at-risk students.
  • Provide competency based study plans for students attempting second, third, and fourth attempts.
  • Promote student success by showing flexibility in style, method, and communication.
  • Assess individual student needs and provide honest feedback about next steps.
  • Provide follow up calls or emails to students to summarize conversations.
  • Establish and maintain office hours for student questions and consultation through phone, email, and IM.
  • Encourage a culture of learning that values mutual responsibility and respect, life-long learning and ethics as well as personal and professional development.
  • Routinely correlate concepts in the learning community with the course of study content.

Collaborate with other professionals within the University to promote a positive atmosphere in a student-focused environment

  • Use knowledge of assessment to suggest revisions of course of study to product development.
  • Identify gaps between student needs and existing resources and services; generate creative resolutions.
  • Communicate with positive regard, respect, and solution- focus with members of other departments.
  • Maintain knowledge of other departments/services such as Well Connect, Center for Writing Excellence, Career Services, etc. in order to connect students when appropriate.
  • Serve on university committees and/or task forces to assist in achieving strategic goals.
  • Engage other departments to solve complex issues students may encounter, outside content.
  • Maintain appropriate notes and records to document attendance and contact with students; maintain confidentiality, according to law.
  • Develop and maintain constructive and cooperative working relationships with others.
  • Be available to assist in training new mentors as needed.

Maintain scholarly and professional expertise through professional development

  • Maintain subscriptions to professional journals and memberships in professional associations most relevant to one’s area of expertise.
  • Participate in professional conferences as an attendee and/or as a presenter.
  • Attend and actively participate in training opportunities provided in online and in person settings.
  • Maintain the certifications, licenses or other professional credentials that were required for the position at the time of hiring.
  • Actively seek out opportunities to meet with faculty of other institutions who share your area of expertise.

Balance content delivery with exceptional student service

  • Provide prompt and courteous service, including keeping all scheduled appointments; in emergencies, give students appropriate and timely notice.
  • Return all calls or emails within 4 business hours; Provide resolution or update student about progress on resolution of issue within 24 hours.
  • Facilitate student interaction with other departments or personnel when needed to ensure the students get support and service.
  • Provide honest feedback and recommendations while listening with an empathetic ear, explaining unwritten rules, acknowledging disappointments, and celebrating triumphs.
  • Develop a teaching style that is individualized to student needs while also emphasizing real-world application of content.
  • Work with difficult people in a positive and proactive manner.
  • Clarify misconceptions by communicating the WGU mission and structure; provide a rationale behind policies.

Perform other duties as assigned

  • Maintain a non-traditional schedule with a minimum of ten (10) hours per week outside the hours of 9 to 5 (in the employee’s home time zone).
  • Plan vacation days in advance and collaborate with team members for adequate coverage.
  • Attend WGU academic meetings on a time table and at a geographic location determined by management, usually twice a year.
  • Embrace change proactively.
  • Keep up-to-date technically and apply new knowledge to job responsibilities.
  • Contribute to the wider WGU community by participating in collaboration opportunities, including focus groups and the Mentor Development Community.

PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS

  • Effective mentoring of students with a professional approach and knowledge of the competency based model.
  • Positive working relationship with student mentors, course mentors and students.
  • Response time to students and University employees is appropriate and aligned with the University goal.
  • Maintain reports of student progress ensuring that reports and documents are neat, accurate, and completed timely.
  • Calls and inquiries are courteously and professionally resolved or referred.
  • The University’s professional reputation is maintained.
  • Management is appropriately informed of area activities and of any significant problems.

Required Skills

  • Success in working on complex projects using a collaborative work model;
  • Superior writing and technology skills;
  • Mastery of relevant competencies and topics associated with the assigned COS(s);
  • Well organized;
  • Attentive to detail;
  • Ability to assist and support others;
  • Subject matter expertise in K-12 Children’s Literature;
  • Ability to respond quickly and thoroughly to student questions and concerns; and
  • Travel to and participation in semi-annual academic meetings is required.

Required Experience

Minimum Qualifications Education: A doctorate or terminal degree in the specified content area. Other qualifications and/or licensure may be required for some degree programs.

Experience/Expertise: Experience providing student support and instruction; demonstrated ability to work with struggling or at-risk learners.

Hard/technical skills: Able to utilize phone, email, Internet, instant message, Microsoft office suite, and technology based delivery systems. Soft skills: Leadership; communication; independent self-starter/self-manager; understanding and appreciation of competency-based education; proficiency in oral and written English communication; track record for effective coaching and communication skills within a diverse population; and demonstrated professionalism that displays effective judgment and professional integrity. Other: Able to pass a criminal background check. Must be lawfully employable in the United States either by virtue of citizenship or by permanent residency via a green card.

Preferred Qualifications Experience working with adult learners and distance learning environments preferred; experience with APA formatting preferred.

K-12 Children’s Literature Experience

CFP – Special Issue of Bookbird: Translating and Transmediating Children’s Literatures and Cultures

Call for Papers for Special Issue of Bookbird
Translating and Transmediating Children’s Literatures and Cultures

Bookbird: A Journal of International Children’s Literature seeks contributions for a special issue on the translation and transmediation of children’s literatures and cultures. Mediation – whether in the form of adaptation, translation or remediation – allows for a reevaluation of a variety of notions ranging from authenticity, textuality, authorship, audience agency, age appropriateness, creativity, and storytelling. Henry Jenkins’ definition of “transmedia storytelling,” in particular, encapsulates the worldbuilding strategies of most of today’s popular children’s literary/cultural products. The lure of Alice in Wonderland, Harry Potter, or the Moomins is considerably enhanced by the plethora of interconnected media platforms – novel, film, animation, computer game, fanfiction, cosplay, collectibles, etc – all of which maximize audience engagement by unfolding an increasingly elaborate fictional reality. The way in which each media “adds a new cultural layer, supporting more diverse ways of communicating, thinking, feeling, and creating than existed before” (Jenkins, Clinton, McWilliams) resonates with how translation as an inventive “act of both inter-cultural and inter-temporal communication” (Bassnett) allows us to see in different ways the original text that always already “bears in itself all possible translations and gets richer with each additional reading-rewriting,” as Walter Benjamin put it.

Topics for papers might include, but are not limited to:

  • de/reconstructing fictional realities and expanding storyworlds through media/language change
  • domestication and foreignization as strategies of translating/transmediating children’s literature
  • the visibility and/or the invisibility of mediators of children’s literature
  • intergenerational dynamics in translation and transmediation (crossover fiction, family adventure film, dual audiences, age appropriateness)
  • image-textual dynamics (translating illustrated stories, picturebooks, novelizations and subtitlings of children’s cinema)
  • translation/transmediation of children’s/YA literature as a negotiation process (between publisher demands, parental expectations, social norms, children’s cognitive abilities, emotional needs, and imaginative worlds)
  • importing and exporting children’s literature and culture through translation and transmediation: global challenges, glocal specificities, East meets West
  • interfacing the ethics, politics, and aesthetics of translation and transmediation
  • mediators’ changing the image/voice of the child reader
  • metatextual and metamedial self-reflectivity in the service of audience engagement

Full papers should be submitted to the editor, Björn Sundmark (bjorn.sundmark@mah.se), and guest editor, Anna Kérchy (akerchy@gmail.com) by 1 November 2017. Please see Bookbird’s website at www.ibby.org/bookbird for full submission details.

Cultural Representation of Transnational Childhoods: European-Australian-American Perspectives

Cultural Representation of Transnational Childhoods: European-Australian-American Perspectives
Symposium, Saturday, 13 May 2017, 9am – 6pm
Institute of English Studies, University of Wrocław
Room 212, ul. Kuznicza 22
Wrocław, Poland

Convenors
Dr Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak, University of Wrocław
Dr Dorota Kołodziejczyk, University of Wrocław
Dr Katarzyna Kwapisz Williams, The Australian National University

It is assumed in Western culture that children have a natural need for a stable and safe domestic and familial environment (Holloway & Valentine 2000). Yet research reveals that the number of children whose everyday lives have been marked by mobility and the risks it entails is increasing substantially (Ní Laoire et al. 2010). Child-centered migration studies show that children often become actors in the immigration process as they negotiate identifications with places and cultures. Acknowledging and understanding children’s agency and their active participation in the mobility of their families, e.g. as language and cultural brokers, requires a transnational literacy (Spivak 1992, Brydon 2003, Lee 2011) and reliance on child-centered critical and pedagogical methodologies aimed at examining the influence of transnationalism on children’s lives (Spivak 1992, Brydon 2003, Lee 2011). While much attention has been given to these phenomena in sociological studies of childhood, children’s movement across geopolitical borders also needs to be analysed from a cultural perspective. This symposium will explore past and contemporary representations of transnational childhoods in literature, film and other media that foreground the mobile nature of children’s lives, encouraging reflection on children’s experience of mobility as an essential factor in their cognitive and emotional development.

Recent Publications by IRSCL Members

The following books by IRSCL members have been recently published or are forthcoming:

The Routledge Companion to International Children’s Literature edited by John Stephens (Routledge, September 2017)

Demonstrating the aesthetic, cultural, political, and intellectual diversity of children’s literature across the globe, The Routledge Companion to International Children’s Literature is the first volume of its kind to focus on the undervisited regions of the world. With particular focus on Asia, Africa, and Latin America, the collection raises awareness of children’s literature and related media as they exist in large regions of the world to which ‘mainstream’ European and North American scholarship pays very little attention.

The Routledge Companion to Picturebooks edited by Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer (Routledge, November 2017)

Containing 48 essays by leading and new scholars, this Companion is the ultimate guide to picturebooks. It contains a detailed introduction by the editor, surveying the history and development of the field and emphasising the international and cultural diversity of picturebooks. Divided into 5 key parts the book covers: concepts – from within picturebooks, but also applied from literary theory; genres – from baby books to picturebooks for adults – their relations to other forms such as comics and visual media; domains and theoretical approaches; and adaptations and media.

More Words about Pictures: Current Research on Picture Books and Visual/Verbal Texts for Young People edited by Naomi Hamer, Perry Nodelman, and Mavis Reimer (Routledge)

This volume represents the current state of research on picture books and other adjacent hybrid forms of visual/verbal texts such as comics, graphic novels, and book apps, with a particular focus on texts produced for and about young people. When Perry Nodelman’s Words about Pictures: the Narrative Art of Children’s Picture Books was published almost three decades ago, it was greeted as an important contribution to studies in children’s picture books and illustration internationally; and based substantially on it, Nodelman has recently been named the 2015 recipient of the International Grimm Award for children’s literature criticism. In the years since Words About Pictures appeared, scholars have built on Nodelman’s groundbreaking text and have developed a range of other approaches, both to picture books and to newer forms of visual/verbal texts that have entered the marketplace and become popular with young people. The essays in this book offer ‘more words’ about established and emerging forms of picture books, providing an overview of the current state of studies in visual/verbal texts and gathering in one place the work being produced at various locations and across disciplines. Essays exploring areas such as semiological and structural aspects of conventional picture books, graphic narratives and new media forms, and the material and performative cultures of picture books represent current work not only from literary studies but also media studies, art history, ecology, Middle Eastern Studies, library and information studies, and educational research. In addition to work by international scholars including William Moebius, Erica Hateley, Nathalie op de Beeck, and Nina Christensen that carries on and challenges the conclusions of Words about Pictures, the collection also includes a wide-ranging reflection by Perry Nodelman on continuities and changes in the current interdisciplinary field of study of visual/verbal texts for young readers. Providing a look back over the history of picture books and the development of picture book scholarship, More Words About Pictures also offers an overview of our current understanding of these intriguing texts.

Canon Constitution and Canon Change in Children’s Literature edited by Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer and Anja Müller (Routledge)

This volume focuses on the (de)canonization processes in children’s literature, considering the construction and cultural-historical changes of canons in different children’s literatures. Chapters by international experts in the field explore a wide range of different children’s literatures from Great Britain, Germany, Scandinavia, the Low Countries, Eastern and Central Europe, as well as from Non-European countries such as Australia, Israel, and the United States. Situating the inquiry within larger literary and cultural studies conversations about canonicity, the contributors assess representative authors and works that have encountered changing fates in the course of canon history. Particular emphasis is given to sociological canon theories, which have so far been under-represented in canon research in children’s literature. The volume therefore relates historical changes in the canon of children’s literature not only to historical changes in concepts of childhood but to more encompassing political, social, economic, cultural, and ideological shifts. This volume’s comparative approach takes cognizance of the fact that, if canon formation is an important cultural factor in nation-building processes, a comparative study is essential to assessing transnational processes in canon formation. This book thus renders evident the structural similarities between patterns and strategies of canon formation emerging in different children’s literatures.

Dans les rêves de grand-père by Jean Perrot (Albin Michel)

Jean Perrot quitte sa stature de spécialiste de littérature enfantine et dévoile ici son rôle de grand-père. Avec cet album, il livre à son petit-fils quelques poèmes, jalonnant les étapes de la naissance à l’envol de l’enfant devenu adulte. Attention, étonnement, goût du jeu, inquiétude, admiration… le grand-père dit, en quelques mots, les émotions et les sentiments ressentis sur ce chemin partagé. Des mots pétris d’écoute et de délicatesse, qui se chargent, au fil du temps qui passe, du sens de la vie et qui expriment cet art merveilleux d’être grand-père.

CFP – Special Issue of TEXTURA: Children’s and Young Adult Digital Literature: Apps, Readers and Literary Education

Call for Papers for Special Issue of TEXTURA
Children’s and Young Adult Digital Literature: Apps, Readers and Literary Education
Editors: Edgar Roberto Kirchof, Neus Real, and Cristina Correro

Major changes which digital literature has been generating, as much in the production for children and young adults as in their experiences as readers, place new challenges for literary education. Educators need to know this reality deeply in order to be able to integrate it into the classroom and respond to the social and cultural changes which follow it. The academic journal TEXTURA proposes the publication of a special issue on the theme to contribute to this field, bringing forth reflection and debate. Thus, researchers from international institutions are invited to submit articles which address the following issues:

1) Digital children’s and young adult literature: theory and practice.
2) Literary apps for children and young adults: distinctive features, novelties proposed and potential for literary education (with the possibility of studying specific cultural traditions, i.e., literary apps in a specific language or produced in a specific country).
3) Children’s and young adult digital reading: changes, challenges and continuity.
4) Children and young adult digital literature at school: experiences with children and young adults.

The articles should contain between 30,000 and 50,000 characters in total, including spaces and compulsory elements (title, author, abstract, keywords, full text and references). Articles in Portuguese, Spanish, English, French, and German are accepted. Foreign language articles should contain the English translation of the title, abstract and key words. Articles should be sent to the website of the academic journal TEXTURA: http://www.periodicos.ulbra.br/index.php/txra for external evaluation. Deadline: 31 October 2017. The result of external evaluation will be notified in the following two months.

CFP – Girls’ Studies/Girls’ Culture

CFP: Girls’ Studies/Girls’ Culture
Deadline: April 30, 2017

The Girls’ Studies/Girls’ Cultures Area of the Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association invites proposals for the 2017 MPCA/ACA conference to be held at the Hyatt Regency in St. Louis, MO, October 18-22.

We seek proposals for papers and presentations from graduate students, academics, educators, and activists on girls, girlhoods, girls’ cultures, and the media.

Suggested topics include:

  • media representations of girls, girlhood, girls’ cultures
  • girls as media producers, consumers, and critics
  • girls, politics and activism
  • girls’ organizations
  • girls and work
  • girls, play, and princess cultures
  • transgender girlhood
  • dolls, toys, games
  • fashion and cosmetics
  • girls, friends, and bullies
  • girls, feelings and fantasies
  • girlhood, mental illness, and the media
  • girlhood, education, and vocational training
  • policing girls and girlhood
  • girls, music, dance, and the arts
  • girls, disabilities, and the body
  • shifting definitions of girlhood
  • girls, social media, and digital practices
  • girls, traditional, digital, and media literacy
  • girls, media, and cultural work
  • girls, moral panics, and the media
  • girls and STEM
  • girls and discourses
  • rural girls and media
  • girls, religion, and popular culture
  • girls, intersectionality, and media
  • girls and popular culture methodologies
  • girls, popular culture, and pedagogy
  • girls’ identities and popular culture

Please submit (300-word) abstracts for single papers or full panels (3 to 4 papers max) here: http://submissions.mpcaaca.org by April 30, 2017.

More info about the conference is available here: http://mpcaaca.org/

For questions and queries about the Girls’ Studies/Girls’ Culture Area, please contact Miriam Forman-Brunell: Forman-BrunellM@umkc.edu

CFP – Youth Literature and Media Area of the Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association

The Youth Literature and Media Area of the Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association invites papers for the 2017 MPCA/ACA conference in St. Louis, MO, October 18-22.

There is much to query about the kids these days. This past year we saw the rise of Teen Vogue as a political voice, but a simultaneous decline in the percentage of youth who voted. Millennials now outnumber baby boomers, but are perhaps becoming old news themselves as Forbes Millennials are now outnumbered by Generation Z. Transgender youth have been at the center of debates over school bathroom policies, civil rights, privacy, safety, and identity. Meanwhile, Dorothy Wang became “funemployed” once again.

We are looking for proposals for papers on any aspect of Youth Literature and Media, from the latest YA best seller to my nine-year-old son’s YouTube channel. This area takes an expansive approach to youth, literature, and media. We are interested in youth as both producers and consumers of literature and media, representations of children and youth in literature and media, and the study of lit and media aimed at children and youth.

What more to chew on? How about:

  • Shifting definitions of youth
  • Revisiting youth through nostalgia, revivals, and reboots of old TV shows
  • Youth culture becoming adult culture
  • Millennials, elections, politics, and policies
  • Adult audiences of YA Lit and other youth culture
  • Images and discussion of youth in the news
  • Youth and Social Media: where the kids go when their parents join Facebook
  • Youth access to mediav
  • Youth and traditional, digital, and media literacy…and illiteracy
  • Moral panics around youth
  • Youth and technology
  • Youth subversion of mainstream discourses
  • “Youth” and intersectionality
  • Rural youth
  • Youth in the Trump Era
  • What’s absent from representations of youth in media?

Please submit proposals of single papers or full panels at http://submissions.mpcaaca.org by April 30, 2017.

More info about the conference is available here: http://mpcaaca.org/

For questions and queries about the Youth Literature and Media Area, please contact Patrick Cox, patrick.cox@rutgers.edu.

CFP – Inside the World of Harry Potter

Inside the World of Harry Potter is a proposed interdisciplinary, multi-contributor volume born of the robust field of Harry Potter Studies and the community of collaborators that exists within the Southwest Popular/American Culture Association.

This proposed volume will cover a range of topics within the works of J.K. Rowling. The Harry Potter series is such a rich text for analysis, particularly of social issues that can be extrapolated to real-world, non-fictional settings. The scholarship being produced surrounding the Harry Potter series is phenomenal.

As such, this call for chapters invites interested scholars to submit papers and/or proposals for publication consideration in this edited volume.

Contributions should use the works of J.K. Rowling (the Harry Potter series, or companion works such as The Tales of Beedle the Bard, Fantastic Creatures and Where to Find Them, or Quidditch Through the Ages) to address a social or political issue, such as race, class, gender, sexual orientation, societal structure, age, muggle vs. wizard relations, technology, religion, and so forth. Work using paratexts, such as Pottermore, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Potter Puppet Pals, and the like will be accepted as well. All themes will be considered as related to the overall direction of the volume. In addition, work related to fan practices, or application to real-world issues are always welcome.

Proposals from any academic discipline will be considered. Emerging and early career scholars are especially encouraged to submit. Final papers should be no longer than 30 pages, including references, and should be scholarly in nature yet accessible in language and tone.

For consideration, please submit an abstract/proposal of no more than 500 words to Dr. Christopher Bell, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, at cbell3@uccs.edu. Abstracts/proposals should be sent as Word Document attachments, and should include the author(s)’s name, affiliation, title and email contact information. Abstracts/proposals should be submitted no later than May 1, 2017. Final papers will be due September 1, 2017.