NEWS: Q&A with Professor Roxanne Harde

Date and time: 19th November, at 5 pm Warsaw time, on Zoom.

Register: To attend event, please send an email to justyna.deszcz-tryhubczak@uwr.edu.pl by 17 November, 2021.

The IRSCL Executive Board would like to invite members to Academic Writing and Publishing in Children’s Literature Studies, a Q&A with Professor Roxanne Harde.

Professor Roxanne Harde, the Senior Editor of IRCL, will kindly share her expertise as to how to get published in our field.

She is Professor of English and department chair at the University of Alberta’s Augustana Faculty. A Fulbright Scholar and McCalla University Professor, Roxanne researches and teaches American literature and culture, focusing on children’s literature and popular culture. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles, and her most recent books are The Embodied Child, coedited with Lydia Kokkola (Routledge, 2017), winner of the IRSCL 2019 Book Award, and Consumption and the Literary Cookbook, coedited with Janet Wesselius (Routledge 2021), winner of the SAMLA 2021 Best Book Award. Roxanne is also the Senior Editor of International
Research in Children’s Literature.

NEWS: 2021 Book Week – A Celebration of Children’s Literature

Event: 2021 Book Week: A celebration of children’s literature

Date: Tuesday 19 October 2021

Time: 5:30-8:30 p.m. (Central Time)

Hybrid Event: McNamara Alumni Center, Minneapolis or via livestream

Book Week is the University of Minnesota’s celebration of children’s literature, with an annual author guest talk since 1941. This year’s speaker is Eliot Schrefer and for the first time we’ll be streaming the event live. Which means it’s open and free to anyone interested.

Hybrid Event

This year’s event will be hybrid, which means you have the option to attend in person or livestream the lecture from home. During registration, you must select IN PERSON or VIRTUAL. The deadline to register for attending in person is October 13, 2021.

Register here: https://www.cehd.umn.edu/book-week/#rsvp

Book Week is the annual celebration of children’s books and authors organized at the University of Minnesota since 1941. The event attracts teachers, librarians, educators, students, and audiences passionate about young readers’ literacy. Over the past 79 years, Book Week has featured some of the most notable authors of children’s and YA literature, including Madeleine L’Engle, Kate DiCamillo, Christopher Paul Curtis, and Gene Luen Yang. Book Week is hosted by faculty and graduate students from the children’s literature program in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. The guest author’s books are available for sale and autographing.

Please join us on Tuesday, October 19, 2021, at the McNamara Alumni Center, for a discussion with Eliot Schrefer.

Free and open to the public. CEUs available.

Schedule

  • 5:30-6:15 PM Reception and Opening
  • 6:15-7:00 PM Eliot Schrefer, “It’s lonely out there for a human: How literature for young people can bond us with the natural world.”
  • 7:00-7:30 PM Discussion and Q&A
  • 7:30-8:30 PM Book signing

Eliot Schrefer’s books will be available for purchase from the Red Balloon Bookshop.

2021 Book Week features Eliot Schrefer

Eliot Schrefer is a New York Times-bestselling author, and has twice been a finalist for the National Book Award. In naming him an Editor’s Choice, the New York Times has called his work “dazzling… big-hearted.” He is also the author of two novels for adults and four other novels for children and young adults. His books have been named to the NPR “best of the year” list, the ALA best fiction list for young adults, and the Chicago Public Library’s “Best of the Best.” His work has also been selected to the Amelia Bloomer List, recognizing best feminist books for young readers, and he has been a finalist for the Walden Award and won the Green Earth Book Award and Sigurd Olson Nature Writing Award. He lives in New York City, where he reviews books for USAToday.

Title: “It’s lonely out there for a human: How literature for young people can bond us with the natural world.”

Description: Children have a natural inclination to anthropomorphize the world around them, effortlessly assigning emotional states to the non-human. Zoology has classically encouraged us to do the opposite, to avoid assigning human feelings to non-human animals. But how might this “anthropodenial” maintain the narrative of human exceptionalism that has fueled environmental degradation and climate change … and how might literature for young people provide a hopeful solution?

NEWS: Call for Nominees

Are you – or is one of your students – working on a dissertation on the teaching and learning of literature?

Please consider applying to the Shelby Wolf AERA Literature SIG Award for Outstanding Dissertation in Literature.

Click here for criteria and follow this link to apply: https://forms.gle/Uh4pgdeeqFQXe72z9

If the link to the criteria doesn’t work, copy and paste this address: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1HQQKZdT_Pvh1CIe0uy7hYeMRR83gf5LS/view?usp=sharing

Nominations are due Jan. 16 @ 11:59 PM (Pacific Time).

Don’t hesitate to email Nora Peterman, (petermanno@umkc.edu) if you have questions.

CFP: Children’s Literature in Place – Surveying the Landscapes of Children’s Culture (an Edited Edition)

 

In Place: A Short Introduction, human geographer Tim Cresswell argues that “place” is space that people have made meaningful. While landscapes can be observed objectively, and spaces may be abstract, places are imbued with personal and cultural meaning and attachment. The landscapes, spaces, and places of children’s culture are varied and diverse. Here we propose a survey of the changing landscapes of children’s culture, the expected and unexpected spaces and places that emerge as and because of children’s culture.

We invite submissions for an edited collection dedicated to individual, international, and interdisciplinary considerations of the changing landscapes of contemporary children’s literature, media, and culture, from methodology to content. In particular, we seek explorations of “place” in all of its forms: the places of fiction; physical and virtual children’s places; finding one’s place in children’s culture; the new and expanding places of children’s culture; the places from which scholars approach, assign value to, and collaborate on children’s culture; and even children’s culture’s place in popular culture.

It is our aim to build on the impressive body of international research on children’s literature, media, and culture by considering essays on literary and media phenomena as well as individual case studies focused on the changing landscapes of children’s culture, the places and spaces that make up today’s children’s cultural geography in a time of change.

Chapter topics might include:

  • The place of children’s culture in popular culture
  • Significant landmarks in/of children’s culture
  • Cross- and transmediated places and spaces (e.g., amusement parks, theme parks, film sets, virtual tours)
  • Children’s book festivals and children’s places
  • Children’s literature and travel worldbuilding
  • Visual landscapes
  • Toy landscapes
  • Adaptation, publishing, and diversity
  • Digital era access and collaboration
  • Showcasing and display
  • Ecocriticism and children’s literature and culture
  • Expanding landscapes: new places, cartographies, and pathways
  • New ways of seeing children’s literature through collaboration / interdisciplinarity
  • Crossover spaces

By featuring a variety of forms and approaches to storytelling, including different literary and media formats, modalities, and practices, we hope to gain a variety of insights into the changing landscapes of children’s culture, its spaces, places, and contexts. We would especially like to encourage interdisciplinary scholarly collaborations, international multi-author projects, and, in the spirit of this collection, academic conversations about aspects of children’s culture that don’t have an obvious scholarly place.

Deadline for abstract submissions: December 1, 2021

Contact: Željka Flegar, flegarzn@longwood.edu; Jennifer Miskec, miskecjm@longwood.edu

Essays should be 5,000-7,000 words in length, in MLA format.

Proposals (no more than 1,000 words, including a short bio) are due on December 1, 2021 to the editors: flegarzn@longwood.edu and miskecjm@longwood.edu

*We are currently working with a publisher. We hope to make decisions about accepted articles by mid-January. Full articles would be due by August 1, 2022.

NEWS: Conference – Picturebooks in Time

The conference “Picturebooks in Time”  will be held at Tel Aviv
University, October 3-4, 2021, and will be organized as a hybrid event.

It is possible to receive the Zoom link to be able to listen to the
presentations (you need to register by contacting Tamar Neugarten at:
picturebooks2021@gmail.com).

Further information about the program, including abstracts and bios of
the presenters, can be found on the following webpage:

https://humanities.tau.ac.il/child_culture/conference_2021

CFP: Children’s Literature in Place: Surveying the Landscapes of Children’s Culture (an edited collection)

Deadline for abstract submissions: December 1, 2021

Contact: Željka Flegar, flegarzn@longwood.edu; Jennifer Miskec, miskecjm@longwood.edu

In Place: A Short Introduction, human geographer Tim Cresswell argues that “place” is space that people have made meaningful. While landscapes can be observed objectively, and spaces may be abstract, places are imbued with personal and cultural meaning and attachment. The landscapes, spaces, and places of children’s culture are varied and diverse. Here we propose a survey of the changing landscapes of children’s culture, the expected and unexpected spaces and places that emerge as and because of children’s culture.

We invite submissions for an edited collection dedicated to individual, international, and interdisciplinary considerations of the changing landscapes of contemporary children’s literature, media, and culture, from methodology to content. In particular, we seek explorations of “place” in all of its forms: the places of fiction; physical and virtual children’s places; finding one’s place in children’s culture; the new and expanding places of children’s culture; the places from which scholars approach, assign value to, and collaborate on children’s culture; and even children’s culture’s place in popular culture.

It is our aim to build on the impressive body of international research on children’s literature, media, and culture by considering essays on literary and media phenomena as well as individual case studies focused on the changing landscapes of children’s culture, the places and spaces that make up today’s children’s cultural geography in a time of change.

Chapter topics might include:

  • The place of children’s culture in popular culture
  • Significant landmarks in / of children’s culture
  • Cross- and transmediated places and spaces (e.g., amusement parks, theme parks, film sets, virtual tours)
  • Children’s book festivals and children’s places
  • Children’s literature and travel
  • Worldbuilding
  • Visual landscapes
  • Toy landscapes
  • Adaptation, publishing, and diversity
  • Digital era access and collaboration
  • Showcasing and display
  • Ecocriticism and children’s literature and culture
  • Expanding landscapes: new places, cartographies, and pathways
  • New ways of seeing children’s literature through
  • Collaboration/interdisciplinarity
  • Crossover spaces

By featuring a variety of forms and approaches to storytelling, including different literary and media formats, modalities, and practices, we hope to gain a variety of insights into the changing landscapes of children’s culture, its spaces, places, and contexts. We would especially like to encourage interdisciplinary scholarly collaborations, international multi-author projects, and, in the spirit of this collection, academic conversations about aspects of children’s culture that don’t have an obvious scholarly place.

Essays should be 5,000-7,000 words in length, in MLA format.

Proposals (no more than 1,000 words, including a short bio) are due on December 1, 2021 to the editors: flegarzn@longwood.edu and miskecjm@longwood.edu

*We are currently working with a publisher. We hope to make decisions about accepted articles by mid-January. Full articles would be due by August 1, 2022.

CFP: Child and the Book Conference “The Role of the Child as Citizen: Constructing Childhood through Agency and Activism”

Dates: 26-28 May 2022

Deadline for Abstracts: 15 November 2021

The advisory board of the “Child and the Book” conference series, would like to call your attention to the next Child and the Book conference, “The Role of the Child as Citizen: Constructing Childhood through Agency and Activism”, to be held at the University of Malta, May 26-28, 2022.

Further information can be found here: https://www.um.edu.mt/events/childandbook2022

Please consider that the deadline for the submission of abstracts is November 15, 2021.

NEWS: Innovation and Experimentation in Portuguese Picturebooks

On behalf of the members of The Centre for Research on Children’s and Young Adult Literature at the University of Wrocław, members are invited to Professor Ana Margarida Ramos’ online lecture, Innovation and Experimentation in Portuguese Picturebooks, the fourth talk in the “International Voices in Children’s Literature Studies” series, to be held on October 13, 2021, at 6 p.m. Warsaw time.

In recent years, the quality and diversity of Portuguese picturebooks has been internationally recognised and acknowledged with several important awards; indeed, new creators are being distinguished for their increasingly elaborate and complex proposals which challenge the traditional relationship between the reader and the picturebook.

This presentation identifies the main contemporary trends in Portuguese picturebooks in order to characterize their recent revolution.  These trends include the introduction of elements of surprise, humour, challenge, and reflection; the growth of the illustration inside the picturebook and its displacement into other parts of the book; the investment in playfulness via the introduction of visual games, intertextual readings, parody, visual narratives, and parallel stories; the creation of an original and easily identifiable personal style (a kind of visual signature); and the creation of special art reading objects that highlight the importance of book design.

When: October 13, 2021 at 18:00 (CET)

Where: Microsoft Teams*

*If you are interested in taking part in the lecture, please contact us by email by October 10 at mateusz.swietlicki@uwr.edu.pl

CFP: Dreams

In past years, the International Committee of the Children’s Literature Association has organized a special panel focusing on children’s and young adult literature from a specific country at the conference. This year, we are hosting a themed panel at the ChLA annual conference to be held in Atlanta, Georgia from June 2-4.

To that end, we seek paper proposals on the topic of “Dreams” that approach this theme from an international, non-Euro-American perspective. Preference will be given to papers that examine texts originally written in languages other than English and/or created by authors and illustrators from communities beyond Anglo-American children’s and YA publishing traditions, including global indigenous communities. Topics could include but are not limited to the following:

  • Dreams as the vision of what is possible, including political / social change
  • Children’s dreams, aspirations or nightmares (literal and figurative)
  • Adults’ dreams or visions about childhood
  • Dreams as expressions of cultural desires, aspirations or fears
  • Dreams as a narrative device (“it was all just a dream”)
  • Dreams and storytelling as imaginative work
  • Freudian understandings of dreams as “wish fulfillment” as well as other interpretive paradigms that come from non-western traditions
  • Symbolism and meanings of dreams in various cultures (e.g. Dreamtime)
  • Dreams of other places, spaces, and opportunities
  • Dreams as a way of memorializing/recovering the past
  • Dreams as a way to make sense of or to re-imagine selfhood
  • Dream worlds vs lived realities
  • Inter-generational dreams/visions
  • Dreamers and visionaries

Since there might be an option to present at the conference virtually, we encourage scholars and students who are based outside of North America to submit proposals.

Please submit a 350-word abstract and a 200-word biographical statement with the subject line, “ChLA 2022 Themed Panel Submission” to nithya.s@txstate.edu by 11:59 p.m. (Pacific Standard Time) September 30, 2021.

Two abstracts will be selected, and the authors will receive “The ChLA International Honor Award,” which includes a grant of $500 each to cover expenses related to the conference (such as the membership and registration fees). Those papers selected for the International Focus panel will accompany a presentation by the Distinguished Scholar who will be invited by the committee to present at the conference.

Authors of proposals selected for the panel will be notified by October 10, 2021.  The International Committee encourages those scholars who are not selected for the Themed Panel to submit an abstract through the general Call for Proposals so that international children’s literature will become part of other panels at the conference.

The deadline for general submission to the ChLA 2022 Annual Conference is October 15, 2021.

NEWS: First Online Series on Translation for Children and Young Adults at NUI Galway

Starting: October 27, 2021, running monthly

Register online: https://forms.gle/3fXdyw1QemNAA5Pu5

Funded by the Athena Swann Scheme in the College of Arts, Social Sciences and Celtic Studies at NUI Galway, six webinars on translation for children and young adults organised by Dr. Pilar Alderete Diez (NUI Galway) will take place monthly, kicking off in October.

All talks are free to attend, and are followed by a discussion and conversations will start at 6:00pm GMT and finish at 7:30pm GMT.

October 27, 2021 – MS. NOEMI RISCO

http://www.noemirisco.me/p/mis-traducciones.html

November 24, 2011 – PROFESSOR ZOHAR SHAVIT

https://english.tau.ac.il/profile/zshavit

December 22, 2021 – DR. VANESSA LEONARDI

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Vanessa-Leonardi

January 26, 2022 – DR. OWEN HARRINGTON-FERNANDEZ

https://researchportal.hw.ac.uk/en/persons/owen-harrington-fern%C3%A1ndez

February 23, 2022 – MR. MUIRIS O’RAGHALLAIGH

http://otherwordsliterature.eu/eng/blog/muiris_o_raghallaigh_children_s_books_from_ireland_dutch_foundation_for_literature

March 23, 2022 – PROFESSOR EMER O’SULLIVAN

https://www.leuphana.de/institute/ies/personen/emer-osullivan.html